Introduction

Oooh this is dangerous.

It started with Intel quietly (but not too quietly) informing many in the industry of its plans to enter the graphics market with something called Larrabee.

NVIDIA responded by quietly (but not too quietly) criticizing the nonexistant Larrabee.

What we've seen for the past several months has been little more than jabs thrown back and forth, admittedly with NVIDIA being a little more public with its swings. Today is a big day, without discussing competing architectures, Intel is publicly unveiling, for the first time, the basis of its Larrabee GPU architecture.

Well, it is important to keep in mind that this is first and foremost NOT a GPU. It's a CPU. A many-core CPU that is optimized for data-parallel processing. What's the difference? Well, there is very little fixed function hardware, and the hardware is targeted to run general purpose code as easily as possible. The bottom lines is that Intel can make this very wide many-core CPU look like a GPU by implementing software libraries to handle DirectX and OpenGL.

It's not quite emulating a GPU as it is directly implementing functionality on a data-parallel CPU that would normally be done on dedicated hardware. And developers will not be limited to just DirectX and OpenGL: this hardware can take pure software renderers and run them as if the hardware was designed specifically for that code.

There is quite a bit here, so let's just jump right in.

The Design Experiment: Could Intel Build a GPU?
POST A COMMENT

101 Comments

View All Comments

  • ocyl - Monday, August 04, 2008 - link

    Larrabee will be shipped when Diablo III is, and it will mark the beginning of the end for DirectX.

    Calling it first here at AnandTech.

    Thanks go to Anand and Derek for the very well written article. You are the ones who keep tech journalism alive.
    Reply
  • erikespo - Monday, August 04, 2008 - link

    "At 143 mm^2, Intel could fit 10 Larrabee-like cores so let's double that. Now we're at 286mm^2 (still smaller than GT200 and about the size of AMD's RV770) and 20-cores. Double that once more and we've got 40-cores and have a 572mm^2 die, virtually the same size as NVIDIA's GT200 but on a 65nm process. "

    this math is way off

    143 mm^2 is 20449mm.. if they fit 10 there that is 2044.9 per core
    286mm^2 is 81796mm.. that is 4X the space so 40 cores in 286^2
    and 572mm^2 is 327184mm is 160 cores..

    double length will double area.. doubling length and width will quadruple area.
    Reply
  • bauerbrazil - Monday, August 04, 2008 - link

    Hahahaha, YOUR math is way off!!!

    Jesus.
    Reply
  • erikespo - Monday, August 04, 2008 - link

    I see where the article and you got your math..
    you both did 143mm^2 / 10 and got 14.3 then divided 286^2 by 14.3 and got 20.. this math is only acting on the one number..

    I know this because the area of 14.3 is 204.49 mm. 10 of those would be 2044.9mm. but the area of 143mm^2 is 20449mm.
    Reply
  • WeaselITB - Monday, August 04, 2008 - link

    Wow ... No.
    143mm^2 is NOT equivalent to 143^2 mm ... Your analysis is flawed.

    If we use your example, 2mm^2 is NOT 2mm x 2mm ... it's actually root(2)mm x root(2)mm ... 4mm^2 is 2mm x 2mm, not 4mm x 4mm (that'd be 16mm).

    Maybe you should examine in depth that Wikipedia article you linked earlier ...

    Thanks,
    -Weasel
    Reply
  • MamiyaOtaru - Monday, August 04, 2008 - link

    143mm^2 is NOT equivalent to 143^2 mm

    ^^THIS

    That's it in a nutshell. mm² doesn't mean you square 143, it refers to Square Millimeters, a unit of area (unlike Millimeters, a unit of distance).

    Revised mspaint illustration: http://img379.imageshack.us/my.php?image=squaremmh...">http://img379.imageshack.us/my.php?image=squaremmh...
    Reply
  • erikespo - Monday, August 04, 2008 - link

    Anandtech Comment Section.. Forever record of my retardedness Reply
  • erikespo - Monday, August 04, 2008 - link

    Dang.. Many apologies..
    got my square area and squared numbers confused..
    Reply
  • WeaselITB - Monday, August 04, 2008 - link

    [quote]4mm^2 is 2mm x 2mm, not 4mm x 4mm (that'd be 16mm).[/quote]

    Dang, that was supposed to read "(that'd be 16mm^2)."

    Thanks,
    -Weasel
    Reply
  • erikespo - Monday, August 04, 2008 - link

    another way to look as it is how man 143mm^2 squares does it take to make up 286mm^2?

    only 2 would only be 143mm x 286mm

    since 10 cores fit into 143 x 143, 20 will fit into 143 x 286mm
    286 x 286 (which is double that of 143 x 286mm) the 286mm^2 would fit 40
    Reply

Log in

Don't have an account? Sign up now