The Display

Acer uses an LG sourced 10.1-inch 1366 x 768 IPS panel for the W510. Viewing angles are great as are the rest of the basics. Max brightness is pretty low at just under 300 nits, but the flip side of that coin are very low black levels resulting in great contrast. Compared to the netbooks that Acer was shipping just a few years ago, the W510 is worlds better.

The low max brightness makes the W510 not ideal for use outdoors in bright sunlight:

Display Brightness

Display Brightness

Display Contrast

Color accuracy out of the box isn’t great, but it’s really no worse than something like the Nexus 10 if you look at our CalMAN results.

Once again I turned to our own Chris Heinonen's CalMAN smartphone/tablet workflow. We'll start off by looking at the calibrated white point for these tablets. What you're looking for here is a number close to 6500K:

CalMAN Display Comparison - CCT

The next three charts look at accuracy represented as a difference between various source colors and what's reproduced on the display. The results are presented as average dE2000, with lower numbers being better.

First up is Grayscale performance, here we're looking at the accuracy of black, white and 19 shades of gray spread in between the two extremes:

CalMAN Display Comparison - Grayscale

First in our color accuracy tests is a saturation sweep. Here we're looking at 20%, 40%, 60%, 80% and 100% saturations of red, blue, green, magenta, yellow and cyan.

CalMAN Display Comparison - Saturation Sweep

Gamut CIE Chart


 

Saturation CIE Chart


 

For our final accuracy test we're looking at the difference between a Gretag Macbeth colorchecker chart and the rendered swatches on these displays. Once again, lower numbers are better.

CalMAN Display Comparison - GMB Colorchecker

GMB Color Checker


Acer doesn’t really make an effort to calibrate the display at the factory, but there’s not too much room for improvement here based on my calibration passes (I managed to get dE down to the mid 4s compared to the GMB chart). Nothing about the W510’s display really looks bad, but it does lack that extra oomph of Apple’s 3rd and 4th gen iPad with Retina Display. Microsoft did a better job on color accuracy with the panel in Surface RT. On the bright side, the display really is such a huge improvement over what we’re used to seeing from a Windows PC priced at $499.

The relatively small display size means the native resolution isn’t really too much of a problem. More resolution would always be appreciated, but in this case Clover Trail doesn’t really have the GPU to drive it. In my experience with the W510 I didn’t really find myself wishing I had a higher resolution display, although I’d be very surprised if the next-generation of these tablets didn’t ship with something higher res.

The Dock Experience, Software & Stability CPU Performance
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  • DaveSimmons - Thursday, December 20, 2012 - link

    If you get a chance could you test the Netflix performance, both on the screen and through the HDMI? Reply
  • fredbloggs73 - Thursday, December 20, 2012 - link

    I would also like to know how this tablet performs with an external monitor in a desktop environment. I get the feeling that the GPU will limit this function. Reply
  • unrulycow - Thursday, December 20, 2012 - link

    The table on the first page should be changed to reflect the fact that the Nexus 10 starts at $399, not $499 Reply
  • Anand Lal Shimpi - Thursday, December 20, 2012 - link

    Fixed! Reply
  • kyuu - Thursday, December 20, 2012 - link

    Yeah, that's about what I was worried about with Haswell -- marginally better CPU performance than the Atom we know and hate, and an utter crap GPU. Thanks but no thanks, Intel. If they stuck Brazos in these devices they'd be way more appealing (assuming a similar power-profile).

    I'm very interested in getting one of these devices, but Haswell is a no-go, and I'm not sure about something like the Surface Pro. Its specs are great (asides from Intel's crap GPU, again, but at least the HD4000 is passable), but I'm thinking it's going to be too heavy/bulky, too warm, and too noisy (fans) to be something I'd take over a regular laptop.

    Hopefully the 2nd gen devices come sooner rather than later, as these 1st gens just aren't cutting it.
    Reply
  • kyuu - Thursday, December 20, 2012 - link

    Oh, and uh... I remember a review of the Lumia 920 being in the works, like, weeks ago. Did that get shelved or what's going on with that? Reply
  • name99 - Thursday, December 20, 2012 - link

    Oh don't be an idiot.
    The numbers are basically that a high-end Atom is about 1.5x the CPU performance (on multithreaded tasks only? not clear from what Anand has given us here) of a high end ARM.

    Meanwhile a high-end IB i7 is 5x the performance of a high-end ARM, and Haswell will improve on that.
    Haswell is a high performance followup to IB, it's not a followup to Atom.
    Reply
  • kyuu - Thursday, December 20, 2012 - link

    Sorry, I am an idiot: I meant Clover Trail, the SoC in this tablet, not Haswell. That was an utter brain fail on my part. >< Reply
  • Ytterbium - Thursday, December 20, 2012 - link

    Hi Anandtech,

    Can you review the Dell Latitude 10 & Lenovo ThinkPad Tablet 2?

    I think each one has some unique features vs the ones you looked at so far.
    Reply
  • jeffkibuule - Thursday, December 20, 2012 - link

    I don't think the editors have enough time to review every single laptop/tablet released. Besides, is the Lenovo ThinkPad Tablet 2 even out yet? Reply

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