Snapdragon 600 - CPU Performance

With the low level look at Krait 300 out of the way, let's see how the One fares in our standard suite of Android based CPU tests.

We'll start with SunSpider 0.9.1, our trusty javascript performance test. 

Despite the low level improvements, HTC's One here doesn't offer any advantage over the APQ8064 based flagships from last year. I suspect what we're seeing here are limits of software/browser optimizations on the One rather than a conclusion about the performance of its hardware.

SunSpider Javascript Benchmark 0.9.1 - Stock Browser

Google Octane Benchmark v1

The One's standings improve as we look at Google's Octane test, effectively tying the performance of the Atom based Motorola RAZR i. The Exynos 4412 based Galaxy Note 2 continues to perform very well here, despite being built on older Cortex A9 hardware running at a slightly lower clock frequency.

Mozilla Kraken Benchmark

Kraken is likely the least optimized for javascript benchmark we have in our suite, which makes it (temporarily) interesting. There's also the fact that the benchmark is quite large and takes a while to run on all platforms, giving us some more useful results. Here the One is second only to the Cortex A15 based Nexus 10 tablet, which should be faster given its higher TDP and much beefier microarchitecture. Otherwise the One is the fastest Android device we've tested here.

BrowserMark 2.0

BrowserMark 2.0 goes back to having the GNote 2 on top in the phone space, nearly equalling the performance of the Nexus 10. The data is very strange but I don't have a good explanation for it, other than that we really need to move away from js based benchmarks as soon as good ones are available. The BrowserMark 2.0 performance of the One looks very similar to the iPhone 5.

Our two Vellamo benchmarks both show the One doing very well. In the HTML5 test, the One puts everything else to shame - including the old APQ8064 based Droid DNA and the Galaxy Note 2. The Qualcomm comparison is the more interesting as it echoes some of what we saw in the microbenchmarks - take into account the clock speed difference and you're looking at a 22% improvement in performance due to the new Krait 300 cores.

Vellamo Benchmark - 2.0

The Vellamo Metal score shows a smaller overall performance advantage (~11% if you take into account the clock speed difference), but still a measurable one nonetheless. Here we also see the Nexus 10 perform as expected:

Vellamo Benchmark - 2.0

Subjectively, the new Snapdragon 600 platform is appreciably quicker than the previous generation S4 Pro. The margin of improvement will really depend on the application you're using, but in terms of responsiveness the HTC One is among the best out today. The real question is how Qualcomm's latest will compare once Cortex A15 based SoCs begin shipping in phones, not just from a performance standpoint but taking into account power as well.

 

The One: Powered by Qualcomm's Snapdragon 600 Snapdragon 600 - GPU Performance
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  • Death666Angel - Saturday, April 06, 2013 - link

    I haven't had build quality issues with my 2 Samsung phones so far (SGS2 and GN). You may be confusing build quality with material choices. I personally don't give a damn about my phone being metal. It gets a case around it anyway and then I want to get the weight saving from plastic. :) All else being equal, I'll probably always choose the plastic phone. :D Reply
  • theduckofdeath - Saturday, April 06, 2013 - link

    I agree, the SGS2 is a solid phone. I remember mine getting squeaky after I dropped it pretty hard on a pavement once, so hard that the back popped off and the battery flew out. For a while I thought that I had bent the whole phone, but after looking it all over I realized that it was just the battery that was bent. I flattened it as good as I could, and after that the phone was nice and solid again. :) Reply
  • vvk - Monday, April 08, 2013 - link

    Agree. Plastic survives falls much better than metal and frankly who has not dropped their phone at least ones? And if you use case with the phone the argument for metal becomes even murkier. Reply
  • darwinosx - Tuesday, April 30, 2013 - link

    No it doesn't. Go over the the Squaretrade site and see what they have to say about it. Metal does better Mostar the time. Samsung is just being cheap. Reply
  • Crono - Monday, April 08, 2013 - link

    I'm not "confusing build quality with material choices", though I see what you are getting at.
    While materials aren't everything, they are at least half the equation when looking at build quality. If you have a flimsy plastic housing, but great internals, the result is cheap feeling phone. My current and previous phones have all been plastic, but they've all taken a beating in regular use and look worse for it. I prefer to not need or use a case.

    In any case (pardon the pun), HTC phones have better in-hand feel in my experience even when using plastic.
    Reply
  • AZsoul - Saturday, April 06, 2013 - link

    If you are an existing att customer, no pre-order and no free media link. Another example of their superior customer service. Reply
  • horay - Saturday, April 06, 2013 - link

    That's because AT&T wants you to buy the iphone. Reply
  • darwinosx - Sunday, April 07, 2013 - link

    No carrier wants you to buy the iPhone. They sell it because they have to due to customer demand. they ay more for iPhones and can't load them up with logos and bloatware like Android phones. Reply
  • IsthatyouBevis - Saturday, April 06, 2013 - link

    That is not true. I went to the AT&T store and preordered and recieved the media link. Please don't spread dis-information Reply
  • erikiksaz - Monday, April 08, 2013 - link

    The fact that carriers don't want you to purchase an iphone is absolutely true. The margins are so low that the CSRs very little bonus when they sell an iphone relative to any android product. Reply

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