Video

Apple’s new H6 ISP brings with it a modernization of the video recording options for the iPhone 5s. The default video record mode is still 1080p at 30 fps, but there’s also a new 720p 120 fps “slo-mo” mode as well. In the latter, video is captured at 120 fps but optionally played back at 30 fps in order to achieve a high speed camera/slow motion effect. The result is pretty cool:

In the camera UI you can select what portions of the video you want to play back at 30 fps and what portions you want to leave at full speed. The .mov file is stored on NAND as a ~27Mbps 720p120 without any customizations, however when you share it the entire video is transcoded into a 30 fps format which preserves the slow motion effect.

The slo-mo mode is separate from the standard video recording mode, it’s the next stop on the dial in the new iOS 7 camera app. Video preview in slo-mo mode also happens at 60 fps compared to 30 fps for the standard video record and still image capture modes.

Camera preview frame rate, toggling between slo-mo and normal modes

Adding high speed camera modes to smartphones is a great step in my opinion and a wonderful use of increases in ISP and SoC performance. I would like to see Apple expose a 1080p60 mode as well. Technically 1080p60 does require slightly more bandwidth than 720p120, but I’d hope that Apple targeted both in the design of H6 and simply chose to expose 720p120 as it’s an easier feature to market.

Standard 1080p30 recording is also available:

Camera Display, Cellular & WiFi
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  • Bossrulz - Tuesday, October 22, 2013 - link

    Hi Anand. I am planning to buy my first iphone in the form of 5S.
    Is it worth to buy or to wait for iphone 6 ?
    Is it good to buy in USA or in the country where I live in ?
    Does iphone have internatiobnal warranty ?
    Reply
  • beast from the east - Wednesday, October 30, 2013 - link

    Intel only ever dominiated in sales, not processing power.

    I have installed Apple systems for 25 years, pre-Intel Macs, Apple's computers had twice the performance per clock cycle than the Intel equivalents. From the Motorola chips through to PowerPC.

    That's one of the many reasons why graphics, video and the scientific community used Macs.

    This chip is a beast, we all know it. With the best relationship in the mobile market with Developers that get paid for their work, a fantastic SDK, and Dev's talking about an hour to recompile to 64-bit. I think Apple will be alright.

    Trying to pick holes is just 'Roid-Rage, plain and simple.
    Reply
  • AngryCorgi - Thursday, November 14, 2013 - link

    The math used in this article is incorrect. It is 76.8 GFLOPS per CORE not for the entire GPU. The GPU should be capable of 307.2 GFLOPS. The rest of that chart is wrong as well in most places.

    @650MHZ, per core, G6430 = 166.4 GFLOPS, (*300/650) = 76.8 GFLOPS, (*4) = 307.2 GFLOPS
    Reply
  • ronnieryan - Saturday, January 11, 2014 - link

    @Anand : Sir could you make a review on the history of the iphone's home button? i would really want to know how tough the iPhone 5s home button. I was an android user and wanted to try something new. New in a sense of a 64 bit processor. But i want to know how strong is the 5s home button. Please do make a review of the home button, i would really want to know. email me for the link if its ok...Thanks :D Reply
  • casualphoenix - Wednesday, January 22, 2014 - link

    Hi Anand,

    Hope you're doing well today. My name is Nate Humphries and I'm the Tech/Science editor at CultureMass.com.

    I've been reading through your iPhone 5S and iPad Air articles in preparation for an article about the A7 chip, and it's been an extremely informative read. I wanted to ask if I could use your benchmark charts in my article if I provide proper citation back to your article. I think they would be very helpful for our readers.

    Let me know how that sounds, and I look forward to hearing back from you.

    Thanks,

    Nate Humphries
    Tech/Science Editor | CultureMass
    nate.humphries@culturemass.com
    Reply
  • besweeet - Sunday, March 30, 2014 - link

    I'm curious as to how this website did their 4G LTE tests... On AT&T, I could probably achieve those numbers. Swap that SIM out for one from T-Mobile, and regardless of signal strength, numbers would dramatically decrease instantly. Reply

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