Überclok Reactor: Balanced Performance

by Matt Campbell on 10/10/2008 12:00 AM EST
POST A COMMENT

30 Comments

Back to Article

  • emilyek - Wednesday, October 15, 2008 - link

    You could buy these parts on newegg for close to a third of that.
    Maybe I should start my own company. I wouldn't even need a wholesale license.

    Why 1k watts? Because it's a Cooler Master PSU. You'll find lots of those in pre-builts on e-bay; they can be had cheap, and anyone foolish enough to buy that box will be totally impressed by the high number.
    Reply
  • TheGoat Eater - Sunday, October 12, 2008 - link

    as you can tell by the subject line that pictured HSF (http://images.anandtech.com/reviews/system/2008/ub...">http://images.anandtech.com/reviews/system/2008/ub... is not the Xigmatek HDT-S1283 (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N8...">http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.a...tem=N82E... the Xigmatek HDT-S1283 has 3 heatpipes and the one pictured clearly has 6 heatpipes.
    Just a FYI...
    Reply
  • Uberclok - Tuesday, October 14, 2008 - link

    Quite correct - sorry for the confusion. We built this unit for Anandtech ove a month ago, when we were using the Thermalright Ultima-90 HSF. Not long after we shipped it, we switched to the Xigmatek. Both are heatpipe-based air coolers, not a liquid/air hybrid as a previous poster suggested. Reply
  • Matt Campbell - Tuesday, October 14, 2008 - link

    Thanks for the catch! Reply
  • Zebo - Saturday, October 11, 2008 - link

    Like any regular reader here is going to buy this overpriced computer.

    Whens Anandtech going to start reviewing the Bugatti Veyron or Caviar?
    Reply
  • CEO Ballmer - Friday, October 10, 2008 - link

    These people are suing us over the "Vista Ready" stickers, this could solve the problem. All we need to do is send one of these to all of those cheap PC owners!



    http://fakesteveballmer.blogspot.com">http://fakesteveballmer.blogspot.com
    Reply
  • Stas - Friday, October 10, 2008 - link

    so, aside from the fact that I can build the same system for almost half the price, the 1KW power supply is stupidity. The efficiency cannot be more than 75% even at max load. I would put a Corsair HX520 in it, maybe 600. Cheaper and more efficient. Probably hit 85% at max load, ~80 idle. Reply
  • Stas - Friday, October 10, 2008 - link

    I guess it makes sense for the sake of marketing, as been said, that way customers could put 2xHD4870x2 in it. Which in my opinion is stupid, considering it comes with a $500 card already (just get another one of the same to match in SLI), but whatever. If it sells, it sells. Reply
  • GaryJohnson - Saturday, October 11, 2008 - link

    I'm interested in how well it does sell. I really think these system reviews should be written from the 'here's what the competition is doing' perspective, as I think an AT reader is more likely to be selling pre-built systems than buying them. Reply
  • mgmason - Friday, October 10, 2008 - link

    Is the CPU vCore really set to 1.44 volts as we see on the bios screen, or the more reasonable 1.37? Still seems a bit high, I'm getting a stable 3.2 Ghz out of my Q9450 using only 1.22 volts. I get CPU temps of about 60 degrees under load using air cooling with an Arctic Freezer Pro 7. Reply
  • 7Enigma - Friday, October 10, 2008 - link

    I said it in the Ion review and I'll say it again, this pseudo heatpipe/water cooling thing is just plain junk. I'm sure something like the Tuniq or even cheaper standard heatsink/fan combo's would produce better results. The problem with this cooling system is there just isn't enough reserve liquid, or contact time with the fan-cooled area. Make one or the other larger and the performance should go up a bit, but I just think it's a gimmick for show, a bit of form over function if you will.

    And thank you Christopher for bringing up the PSU. Without checking Anand's old articles, have you guys reviewed this exact PSU system? I'd be very interested to see just how badly the efficiency is due to being 20-30% of rated output for the majority of the time. A 650w PSU would have been perfect for this system, allowing for further OC'ing or added components while keeping the total cost down and possibly greater efficiency of the PSU.
    Reply
  • Uberclok - Friday, October 10, 2008 - link

    >>>A 650w PSU would have been perfect for this system, allowing for further OC'ing or added components while keeping the total cost down and possibly greater efficiency of the PSU<<<

    We always want to ship single card systems with the possibility of adding a second GPU later without upgrading the PSU. Offering the Reactor with a 650-Watt PSU and marketing it as ready to run a pair of HD 4870 X2 would get us assassinated in the reviews. We wish marketing issues never got in the way of efficient design, but that's the reality of retail.

    The Corsair 1000-watt is not horrifically overpriced, and it sets minds at ease. It adds $50 to the cost over the Thermaltake Toughpower 650-Watt modular PSU we've used in the past.
    Reply
  • Uberclok - Friday, October 10, 2008 - link

    >>>his pseudo heatpipe/water cooling thing is just plain junk.<<<

    I think you must have mistaken our CPU cooler for another product. The Xigmatek HDT-S1283 is an air cooler - very similar to the Tuniq Tower 120. There's no liquid involved. It performs almost as well at a lighter weight, which is crucial wehn you're shipping cross-country. The Ion you refer to also uses the same cooler.
    Reply
  • icingdeath88 - Friday, October 10, 2008 - link

    Ok, well since I'm using the HDT-S1283 as well, I have to ask you guys, because I just could not figure it out. How did you apply the thermal compound? There just doesn't seem to be any perfect way, what with the heatpipes involved rather than the usual flat surface.
    Thanks
    Reply
  • JarredWalton - Friday, October 10, 2008 - link

    At idle, efficiency is likely to be very poor, but at load it should get very good efficiency. I'm not saying it's an exact match (because I'm sure it isn't), but as an example the http://www.anandtech.com/casecoolingpsus/showdoc.a...">Zalman 1000W is above 83% efficiency with 120VAC from a load of 200W to 800W, and above 80% from around 150W to 1100W. If we take a baseline 80%, at 195W from the outlet the system idles at 156W, and at medium load it will use over 200W (so above 83%). That's of course assuming this is a good PSU, which I have no reason to doubt -- nearly all of the 1000W PSUs come from one or two ODMs, and with higher margins they also tend to use good components. Reply
  • 7Enigma - Friday, October 10, 2008 - link

    I'm just saying with most computers spending the majority of their time at idle/near-idle, it doesn't make a lot of sense. And that's not even mentioning the hundreds of dollars you could save (though lower margins likely for the company) for the piece itself. The few that do FAH and other idle-cycle programs are probably not being used by the target consumer of this computer. Reply
  • 7Enigma - Friday, October 10, 2008 - link

    The closest reviewed product I could find was another Corsair 1000w but it has a slightly different model number (you reviewed back in April of this year). Here's the direct link to the picture showing the efficiency:

    http://images.anandtech.com/reviews/psu/2008/corsa...">http://images.anandtech.com/reviews/psu/2008/corsa...

    Seems like around idle (where the computer will spend most of it's time) it's closer to 80% efficient, while under load it get's up to closer to 85%. Again the model numbers don't match up exactly, but the general trend should be pretty consistent (ie doing little it's pretty inefficient).
    Reply
  • 7Enigma - Friday, October 10, 2008 - link

    Sorry for the double post, I got an error page and thought the comment hadn't been submitted. Feel free to delete this and the previous duplicate post! Reply
  • Christoph Katzer - Saturday, October 11, 2008 - link

    http://images.anandtech.com/reviews/psu/2007/round...">http://images.anandtech.com/reviews/psu...oundup-8...

    here you can find some more 1000 watts units. The Cooler Master PSU should come close to the Antec and Akasa units.
    Reply
  • 7Enigma - Friday, October 10, 2008 - link

    The closest reviewed product I could find was another Corsair 1000w but it has a slightly different model number (you reviewed back in April of this year). Here's the direct link to the picture showing the efficiency:

    http://images.anandtech.com/reviews/psu/2008/corsa...">http://images.anandtech.com/reviews/psu/2008/corsa...

    Seems like around idle (where the computer will spend most of it's time) it's closer to 80% efficient, while under load it get's up to closer to 85%. Again the model numbers don't match up exactly, but the general trend should be pretty consistent (ie doing little it's pretty inefficient).
    Reply
  • PClark99 - Friday, October 10, 2008 - link

    Looks to me that the PSU in the actual computer is a Coolermaster unit and not the Corsair 1000W modular that you have listed in your specs. Not that it should make much difference, 1000W is way overkill here.
    Reply
  • JarredWalton - Friday, October 10, 2008 - link

    Corrected. Unless Matt can state otherwise (i.e. they changed PSUs for currently shipping systems), this is definitely a Cooler Master PSU. Reply
  • Matt Campbell - Friday, October 10, 2008 - link

    My fault on that one, I just didn't check it closely enough. Currently shipping units definitely list the "Corsair CMPSU-1000HX 1000-Watt", as shown here: http://www.uberclok.com/rPSU.html">http://www.uberclok.com/rPSU.html

    Reply
  • ap90033 - Friday, October 10, 2008 - link

    Holy crap those things are pricey... Reply
  • Christoph Katzer - Friday, October 10, 2008 - link

    And again, what use is the 1000 watts PSU? They can build in half of the size, maybe a little more to keep it quieter, but 1000 watts.... Reply
  • nomagic - Friday, October 10, 2008 - link

    I personally would not mind getting a 1000W PSU because it leave more options open to future upgrades.

    After all, this is an enthusiast PC. There are many that are too lazy to build their own rigs from ground up, so instead they order one with all the basic parts assembled and cable management done. Then they can upgrade their rigs to their hearts' desire. (SLI, Crossfire, RAID...) They can even overclock it further if they like.

    Therefore, having a 1000W PSU installed is a plus.
    Reply
  • Souka - Friday, October 10, 2008 - link

    Might wanna take a read before buying a 1000w PSU

    Debunking Power Supply Myths
    http://www.anandtech.com/printarticle.aspx?i=3413">http://www.anandtech.com/printarticle.aspx?i=3413
    Reply
  • JarredWalton - Friday, October 10, 2008 - link

    As stated below, at idle efficiency is likely to be somewhat poor, but at load it should get very good efficiency. I'm not saying it's an exact match (because I'm sure it isn't), but as an example the http://www.anandtech.com/casecoolingpsus/showdoc.a...">Zalman 1000W is above 83% efficiency with 120VAC from a load of 200W to 800W, and above 80% from around 150W to 1100W.

    If we take a baseline 80%, at 195W from the outlet the system idles at 156W, and at medium load it will use over 200W (so above 83%). That's of course assuming this is a good PSU, which I have no reason to doubt -- nearly all of the 1000W PSUs come from one or two ODMs, and with higher margins they also tend to use good components.

    Is a 1000W PSU required? Absolutely not. Is it desirable? That depends on what you're doing. This system can go up to SLI GTX 280 cards if you want -- or even Tri-SLI I think? Probably to keep things simple Uberclok isn't giving a ton of PSU options. Now, if you were thinking of getting the Reactor with a GTX 260 and dual-core CPU, the 1000W PSU would drop below the 80% efficiency range at idle most likely. Personally, though, I'm not going to freak out about a 2-4% difference in efficiency. Features (i.e. number of connectors) are more important on a high-end PSU than rating and efficiency, IMO.
    Reply
  • Souka - Friday, October 10, 2008 - link

    Might wanna take a read before buying a 1000w PSU

    Debunking Power Supply Myths
    http://www.anandtech.com/printarticle.aspx?i=3413">http://www.anandtech.com/printarticle.aspx?i=3413
    Reply
  • Christoph Katzer - Friday, October 10, 2008 - link

    I guess at $3230 buying price you don't need to care about ~$200 less... Reply

Log in

Don't have an account? Sign up now