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  • DesktopMan - Friday, August 12, 2011 - link

    If Anandtech is attending be sure to pester them about Synergy. Haven't heard much since the announcement in April. Synergy would be very useful for laptops with external desktop GPUs attached. Reply
  • yzkbug - Friday, August 12, 2011 - link

    Ditto!!! Reply
  • sully213 - Friday, August 12, 2011 - link

    From the 1st paragraph....

    "While we aren’t attending SIGGRAPH this year,"

    Reading fail!
    Reply
  • Ryan Smith - Friday, August 12, 2011 - link

    Keep in mind that Synergy doesn't officially exist. Everything we "know" about it is secondhand rumors. NVIDIA will have nothing to say until they have something to announce. Reply
  • icrf - Friday, August 12, 2011 - link

    How does Monterey deal with the extreme paucity of good bandwidth and latency that helps makes GPUs so quick? Reply
  • Ryan Smith - Friday, August 12, 2011 - link

    That's one of the details we don't have at this time. NVIDIA will always have their "secret sauce", but with a preview they're going to be particularly restrained. Reply
  • icrf - Friday, August 12, 2011 - link

    Any idea how RemoteFX handles it?

    I am also making an assumption: the applications are installed on the clients and the rendering is just done on the server with the output returned to the clients. If that's not right and at least some critical parts of the applications are installed on the server, then this is just glorified remote desktop which is much less impressive.
    Reply
  • mapesdhs - Sunday, August 21, 2011 - link


    Ryan Smith writes:
    > That's one of the details we don't have at this time. NVIDIA will
    > always have their "secret sauce", but with a preview they're going to
    > be particularly restrained.

    I tested a system of this kind 10 years ago (SGI's VizServer) while I
    was head admin at a VR research centre (NICVE @ Salford Uni, UK),
    though it also allowed one's local system to exploit the remote
    system's better CPU power aswell. Back then the big machine was a
    16-CPU 5-pipe Onyx2 - long since upgraded/replaced of course.

    We found it was most useful when the task in question was such that one
    wouldn't normally expect real-time update rates even on a high-end
    desktop, eg. very large complex models for CAD, medical, GIS, etc. The
    real benefit was being able to have access to high-end compute and gfx
    power of a remote system even when using a device as simple as a PDA or
    cheap laptop. Thus, for example, a researcher in the field using a low-
    end device could run tasks that exploit the power of a supercomputer
    many miles away.

    If NVIDIA expects to offer users real-time interactivity, I think
    customers may be disappointed, but I would enjoy being surprised if
    they succeed.

    Ian.
    Reply
  • etamin - Friday, August 12, 2011 - link

    Any guesses as to which companies may host these Quadro cloud servers? Amazon? Rackspace? Equinix? I would think it's unlikely that cloud storage companies would jump on Monterey. Reply
  • Conficio - Friday, August 12, 2011 - link

    While they name it "Cloud" it does not mean public cloud neccessarily. I'd rather thing private cloud, liek server room in the same building. Reply
  • liveonc - Friday, August 12, 2011 - link

    But isn't this just another way of not offering people Qudro/GTX??? Reply

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