POST A COMMENT

19 Comments

Back to Article

  • Guspaz - Wednesday, March 07, 2012 - link

    Of all the devices using Apple's embedded SoCs, the AppleTV is the only one that is gauranteed to permanently be connected to the mains; IE, power usage matters a lot less than the mobile devices. Why, then, the single core SoC? It must be a cost thing. Reply
  • crimson117 - Wednesday, March 07, 2012 - link

    $99 is a tight budget for Apple, even if they expect to make money back with media/app purchases. Reply
  • tipoo - Wednesday, March 07, 2012 - link

    Yeah, cost. If it can push 1080p why use more. Reply
  • scook9 - Wednesday, March 07, 2012 - link

    I am guessing they are using this as a place to use A5 chips that are not good enough for the iPad 2 and iPhone 4s. If one of the core is defective, they can disable it and just use the remaining one instead of having to toss the chip. Helps save cost although frankly I am disappointed why the 2nd Gen AppleTV can't do the same things as this one.... Reply
  • solipsism - Wednesday, March 07, 2012 - link

    That's how I interpreted it. I would expect an x-ray to show the same chip across devices. Reply
  • tipoo - Wednesday, March 07, 2012 - link

    That's my guess as well, and why not, if one A5 core can push 1080p content why not use it.

    As for the second gen one I don't think the A4 itself is capable of 1080p content, but it might get a software update for the new UI, we'll see.
    Reply
  • js1882 - Thursday, March 08, 2012 - link

    The 1080p limitation has something to do with the video hardware. I have XBMC installed on my ATV2 and it can decode 1080p, but outputs 720p. From the XBMC FAQ:

    Question: Does the Apple TV 2nd gen output 1080p video?
    Answer: No. The new Apple TV "hockey puck" is fully able to decode and play your 1080p videos using Apple's secret/private VideoToolBox API for hardware-accelerated decoding, but the video display is currently limited to 720p. The 1080p video is decoded, then down-scaled in hardware to 720p. This is low on the priority list to "fix", as it may be a hardware limitation and the ATV 2 has limited hardware resources (only 256MB RAM, etc.)
    Reply
  • ThreeDee912 - Friday, March 16, 2012 - link

    Same with the iPod touch. Normally, iTunes would prevent you from syncing mp4 video greater than 720p onto it.

    Using an app called Air Video, it streams MP4s from a directory on your computer to the iPod, or convert other video types on-the-fly. An unintended feature is that it bypasses the resolution checks in iTunes.

    The iPod touch 4G can play most 1080p MP4s thrown at it, but the interface can get somewhat laggy, and that's still outputting to the 960x640 screen.

    I previously had the 3rd gen touch, and it was the same with 720p. It seemed to be able playback some 720p video, but the interface would lag sometimes, or the app would crash.

    The devices obviously weren't designed for that kind of thing.
    Reply
  • yname - Wednesday, March 07, 2012 - link

    Is 1080p a SW or HW update? If SW, can I upgrade SW on my 2nd generation AppleTV to watch 1080p content?
    If not, I'd be bummed. I bought my ATV in december'11.
    Reply
  • tipoo - Wednesday, March 07, 2012 - link

    I don't think the A4 chip in the second gen is capable of playing 1080p content, so probably hardware. Reply
  • yname - Thursday, March 08, 2012 - link

    Doesn't make sense. A4 is just a processor. It appears to be more of a SW thing rather than HW. Reply
  • tipoo - Thursday, March 08, 2012 - link

    Why does that not make sense? A pentium 3 is just a processor, but it can't run 1080p through no fault of software, its just not fast enough. Reply
  • yname - Thursday, March 08, 2012 - link

    So, is there that kind of gap between A4 and A5 processors in terms of processing speeds? Anyways, I am not happy about this. To me, processing a 1080p signal versus 720p signal is more of a SW feature than A4-A5. Reply
  • tipoo - Thursday, March 08, 2012 - link

    Yes, the A4 had an older Cortex A8 core that was significantly slower.

    The A4 SoC that Apple used in the iPhone 4 and the second generation AppleTV as well as the A5 in the iPad 2 can handle Main Profile level 3.1, which is good enough for 1280x720 video at 30 frames per second. The original AppleTV can only handle 720p at 24 frames.

    "To me, processing a 1080p signal versus 720p signal is more of a SW feature than A4-A5."

    This continues not to make sense. A Pentium 3 can't process 1080P, a Core 2 Duo can, running the same software. So is that a hardware or software thing? Why would they switch to the A5 if the A4 could push 1080p too at a lower cost?
    Reply
  • nice_enough - Monday, April 23, 2012 - link

    Jail-broken Gen2 Applet TV's can output 1080p.

    So the chip can handle it though Apple may not have seen it as being ideal.

    The chip in the old iPhone 3GS has also been proven to handle most 1080 video as well.

    Reply
  • Solidstate89 - Wednesday, March 07, 2012 - link

    So it's now capable of outputting the same content my Boxee Box could last year? Reply
  • AmdInside - Thursday, March 08, 2012 - link

    Is the new interface going to be trickled down to the A4 Apple TV? Reply
  • tipoo - Thursday, March 08, 2012 - link

    Already has been Reply
  • zxzxzxccc - Saturday, March 10, 2012 - link


    ( ww w.paybuybuy.co m )
    y

    DELIVERY TO YOU DOOR TO DOOR in 3-5days
    Reply

Log in

Don't have an account? Sign up now