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  • Sebec - Monday, October 15, 2012 - link

    I think you want to proof read this article -- missing words and typos abound. Reply
  • Freakie - Monday, October 15, 2012 - link

    Maybe I'm just being dumb at the moment, but whats the point of having the Windows 8 Pro Pack and Windows 8 Pro Upgrade Boxed, and then Windows 8 Pro Upgrade Download? Shouldn't the Windows 8 Pro Upgrade Download work for upgrading an existing Windows 8 Core install to Windows 8 Pro? And the Pro Pack is a key-card to download the installation files which makes it no different than the Pro Upgrade and you pay the same price for a download key as you do for Boxed media.

    Is there any real difference between Win8 Pro Upgrade Download and Win8 Pro Pack? I can't see the Windows 8 Pro Upgrade not working for an existing installation of Windows 8. Or is Microsoft feeling a bit barren with only having two versions (Core and Pro) and so instead of confusing people with versions, they're confusing them with upgrade options? xP Either way, I'm gettin' my download version on the 26th :)
    Reply
  • Old_Fogie_Late_Bloomer - Monday, October 15, 2012 - link

    You're not being dumb; you're just not grasping Microsoft's intent. The upgrade from previous versions of Windows is cheap to suck people in. Once you're already using Windows 8, Microsoft has no incentive to discount the upgrade to Windows 8 Pro. Reply
  • Freakie - Monday, October 15, 2012 - link

    I think you're being a little too pessimistic xP Like I said, I HIGHLY doubt that the Win8 Pro Upgrade wont let you upgrade an existing Win8 Core install. Unless Microsoft has completely changed the way they handle upgrade installs all you need is for Windows to have been on the hard drive before. Heck, registry work around exists for even if it's a fresh drive. I just think it's a silly grab at some extra money from customers, to be honest. But who knows, maybe there will be features/limitations that are different between the two. Reply
  • Old_Fogie_Late_Bloomer - Monday, October 15, 2012 - link

    I think I would describe my position as "cynical", rather than "pessimistic". :-P Either way, it's definitely a money grab. Reply
  • rs2 - Monday, October 15, 2012 - link

    Yes, it's probably a money grab. But as money grabs go, it's at least an order of magnitude better than Apple's "we're changing all of our connectors to a proprietary design that won't work with any of your existing accessories unless you buy a $29 adaptor from us" money grab. Reply
  • DanNeely - Monday, October 15, 2012 - link

    I suspect the pro-pack is a download only option; and is priced at the same as the non-discounted price of the downloadable pro-upgrade.

    ex starting feb 1 prices will be:

    Windows 8 Pro Pack $69
    Windows 8 Pro Upgrade (Boxed) $99
    Windows 8 Pro Upgrade (Download) $69
    Windows 8 (Core) OEM $99
    Windows 8 Professional OEM $139

    If there was a core upgrade option the pricing weirdness wouldn't occur; but it was apparently scrapped to cut down on the confusion from having a bunch of upgrade versions around.

    To avoid the confusion their pricing is producing they probably should've just discounted the pro pack too. Looking at what it adds, sales will probably be low enough that it wouldn't really make a difference to their bottom line.
    Reply
  • Metaluna - Monday, October 15, 2012 - link

    So it's confirmed that the $39 upgrade price is a limited-time promotion then? That price has been reported for months now, but I've never been able to determine if it was the normal list price or a special offer. Reply
  • Ryan Smith - Monday, October 15, 2012 - link

    Correct. It's until January 31st, unless Microsoft decides to extend it. Reply
  • imaheadcase - Monday, October 15, 2012 - link

    Depending on sales, so yah they will extend it because sales will be flat.

    Its cheap for a reason, you are paying for Win 7 themes.
    Reply
  • B3an - Monday, October 15, 2012 - link

    What are you about about you silly troll?

    Win 7 themes? What does that even mean? Win 8 desktop has far more features added than 7 did over Vista. Win 8 will sell well and is already the best selling thing on Amazons software list.
    Reply
  • mcnabney - Tuesday, October 16, 2012 - link

    Win 8 also takes away features. If you use and mediacenter functions or have the interest in using a tuner you will have to move up to the most expensive version, the new Pro which replaces Ultimate. That is a 40% more expensive version of software. Also, if you want to play a DVD on your computer, not only will you HAVE to buy the most expensive version of Win8, but you will have to buy the DVD codecs for $10-20 from MS which you ALREADY OWNED under Win7.

    Not really sure what great feature Win8 has that I don't already have under Win7. Win8:Win7 is just like WHS(Vail):WHS1.0. They broke it trying to make it better.
    Reply
  • Golgatha - Tuesday, October 16, 2012 - link

    Yeap, Win7 is the new XP. I'm one of those people who get asked by friends and family if it's worth upgrading. For Win7 from WinXP, I say absolutely yes. My answer is decidedly no for Win8 from Win7. Also, the fact that I can't get a full retail copy to (legally) transfer between upgrades makes the software offerings MS has pretty much useless to me. Reply
  • This Guy - Wednesday, October 17, 2012 - link

    Windows 8 Pro Upgrade (Download) - $39

    Because the kind of people that run a HTPC are the kind that wait for things to become mainstream before purchasing and don't care about a 4m GUI and the ability to just ram the mouse into a corner instead of trying to click a tiny dot.

    Can we get a timer so a page has to be open for more than 30 seconds before someone can comment?
    Reply
  • imaheadcase - Tuesday, October 16, 2012 - link

    Themes? You know those add ons that change UI and other little things. Far more features? Hardly. the "features" that are being praised are nothing mind blowing, and many are available 3rd party. Reply
  • Solidstate89 - Tuesday, October 16, 2012 - link

    No really, tell me more lies. Reply
  • melgross - Monday, October 15, 2012 - link

    I wonder about the $39.95 offer to those using the preview versions? That was written about here, and a few other places as well. Reply
  • lowlymarine - Monday, October 15, 2012 - link

    It appears they've just decided to extend it to everyone, unless that was specifically said to be for a retail box. Reply
  • Belard - Tuesday, October 16, 2012 - link

    Win8Pro $39.99 upgrade price is $39.69 too much.

    PS: Why not make it $40? $100 $140?

    Oh yeah, Americans are stupid... Hence, we see these cars selling for $19,995 so the brain of the idiot goes "wow, its under $20K!)
    Reply
  • Malih - Wednesday, October 17, 2012 - link

    well, not just Americans, I've been to a few places around the world and price tags are mostly always like that, that's probably how the brain works, well, at leasat it works on me. Reply
  • Old_Fogie_Late_Bloomer - Monday, October 15, 2012 - link

    The fact that it costs less to upgrade Windows 7/Vista/XP computers to Windows 8 Pro than it does to upgrade Windows 8 is kind of a dick move. It really drives home just how badly Microsoft wants everyone using Windows 8. Once you're in, though, Microsoft doesn't feel the need to do you any favors when it comes to upgrading to the Pro version. Reply
  • kmmatney - Monday, October 15, 2012 - link

    I agree, and don't understand that move. The upgrade from Standard to Pro should be $30. What do you even get? The ability to join a domain and backup? (and why they don't have backup for Home users is beyond me...). Reply
  • mcnabney - Tuesday, October 16, 2012 - link

    Media functions. They ripped most media-handling abilities out of the default version. So if you have HTPC you have to buy the equivalent of Ultimate + an additional codec purchase through the MS store to get it to work. Reply
  • Golgatha - Tuesday, October 16, 2012 - link

    This. Makes about as much sense as ripping the DVR functionality from Media Center in the Pro version of Win7, but including it in the Home Premium version. Reply
  • This Guy - Wednesday, October 17, 2012 - link

    Unless Windows 8 ain't actually a Windows, I'm pretty sure you can install whoever's codecs you like. Reply
  • ananduser - Monday, October 15, 2012 - link

    Why should you get any favors ? W8 is state of the art software. Where did you get the feeling that you're entitled to dirt cheap prices ? Reply
  • FATCamaro - Monday, October 15, 2012 - link

    Apple? Reply
  • damianrobertjones - Monday, October 15, 2012 - link

    Now come on... we all know that you pay more for the hardware (And someo of their OSX releases barely offer anything new) Reply
  • ananduser - Monday, October 15, 2012 - link

    Apple ?. MS doesn't have to compete with Apple in a race to the bottom regarding software prices. Furthermore Windows 8 is well worth its asking price, even without discounts, compared to an OS that only works on a limited hardware configuration that is also limited in feature set.

    BTW if you're an Apple user you shouldn't use(as Apple would like it) windows anyway and MS is not obligated to cater to you like Apple. You paid 40% margin on Apple's hardware, you can afford fat margins for other companies as well. Windows on your mac is a privilege not a right.

    My advice to you is to stop whining and pay up for windows as long as it is cheap. You wouldn't like to pay the post Jan 31st prices.
    Reply
  • melgross - Monday, October 15, 2012 - link

    You're right, they encourage their ODM manufacturers to fight a race to the profit less bottom. I suppose that makes it better. Reply
  • ananduser - Tuesday, October 16, 2012 - link

    That's false because it's not unanimous. You have cheap and you have premium. Your choice.

    Cheers melgross, AppleInsider mod :)
    Reply
  • kmmatney - Monday, October 15, 2012 - link

    Because they are years late to the tablet party, and their latest phone OS has flopped so far? Reply
  • damianrobertjones - Monday, October 15, 2012 - link

    Didn't they start the tablet party? Ohh yeah, they did Reply
  • steven75 - Monday, October 15, 2012 - link

    More like they tried to start the tablet party and no one showed up until Apple sent out an invite years later. Reply
  • kmmatney - Monday, October 15, 2012 - link

    I consider Tablets devices that are designed with finger input. Windows XP Tablet Edition, requiring a stylus, and used by nobody, hardly counts. The Apple newton was a tablet with stylus input and came out way before anything Microsoft had to offer, but that also sucked and was used by nobody. Reply
  • mcnabney - Tuesday, October 16, 2012 - link

    And the $1500 starting price of touch enabled tablets might have scared some people off. Reply
  • Old_Fogie_Late_Bloomer - Monday, October 15, 2012 - link

    The heck are you going on about? Not sure if trolling or can't read.

    My point was that the prices betray Microsoft's motives. Anyone who thinks they're offering a $40 upgrade from 7/Vista/XP out of the goodness of their hearts is being naive. They have a vested financial interest in people switching to Windows 8, so they can put their app marketplace in front of their faces.

    The fact that the Windows 8 Pro Pack is so much more expensive just goes to show that their concern is not for the happiness and well-being of their customers.

    At any rate, I recently spent quite a lot more than any of these prices for several copies of Windows 7. The value of Windows 8 is, to me, somewhere south of $0, so the prices they charge don't affect me at all.
    Reply
  • ananduser - Monday, October 15, 2012 - link

    Makes perfect sense for MS to do as much as possible to increase W8 adoption. It's a sound business decision. The "good heart" argument is stupid for any company. Reply
  • kmmatney - Monday, October 15, 2012 - link

    I just bought the Windows Pro upgrade from NewEgg for $59. I would have much rather downloaded for $39. I wonder if I can cancel, since it presumably hasn't shipped yet? Can't say I like Windows 8 all that much, but it once you use ClassicShell to get a start menu, and put a desktop application in the startup folder, you basically have Windows 7 with a few new features like storage Spaces. Reply
  • ananduser - Monday, October 15, 2012 - link

    Or windows to go, or built in hypervisor, or free, spotify like(ads), xbox music - not available on win7. Reply
  • kmmatney - Monday, October 15, 2012 - link

    I guess I don't need any of that.. I already use Pandora for music (or just use my own music collection). My experience with Metro apps so far has been pretty bad - they just don't seem to be designed for a large 24" monitor. It seems like so much space is wasted on the screen. Reply
  • Spivonious - Monday, October 15, 2012 - link

    Or Windows ID, Skydrive integration, Facebook/Flickr/LinkedIn/Twitter/whatever else integration, the Share and Search charms (really exciting possibilities with those), hardware-accelerated graphics, DPI-independent graphics (on Metro), improved Task Manager, File History, the list goes on and on.

    Anyone who reads Anandtech who doesn't like Windows 8 and doesn't feel the upgrade is worth $40 hasn't used it. Windows 7 is still in there. Why not get the new stuff too?
    Reply
  • Old_Fogie_Late_Bloomer - Monday, October 15, 2012 - link

    "Anyone who reads Anandtech who doesn't like Windows 8 and doesn't feel the upgrade is worth $40 hasn't used it."

    I hear this a lot. It's flat-out untrue, though.
    Reply
  • andrewaggb - Monday, October 15, 2012 - link

    "I hear this a lot. It's flat-out untrue, though."

    Why is it untrue? In my experience so far running rtm it's been true.
    Just like windows 7, but faster. And with better multi-monitor support (in desktop), better taskmgr, lots of little things that are better and a few that are probably worse.

    Metro with mouse/keyboard isn't great, and on multiple monitors it's plain stupid, but I just don't use those parts and stay in the desktop the whole time.
    Reply
  • Old_Fogie_Late_Bloomer - Monday, October 15, 2012 - link

    What I quoted is untrue because I do not like Windows 8 and I have, in fact, tried it--on three different computers, no less.

    It only takes one example to prove a blanket statement like that wrong, but setting that technicality aside, I very much doubt that I am the only person who a) has tried Windows 8 and b) didn't like it. If you like it, great, but not everyone does.
    Reply
  • imaheadcase - Monday, October 15, 2012 - link

    All those things you mentioned are available for Win 7.

    If you think upgrading software for integration or things you are to lazy to install, then by all means get it.

    But MS also included items in every other OS version that people found interesting, but not worthy in the long run.
    Reply
  • B3an - Monday, October 15, 2012 - link

    So you'd rather use bloated software to do all the tasks that Win 8 does much more efficiently while STILL using less RAM and resources than Win 7? And you can't get anything like Storage Spaces on Win 7.

    It's worth it for the performance improvements alone. Theres also better security and built-in Anti Virus now. Which again is better than most bloated AV software and don't slow the system down at all.

    Go back to using DOS.
    Reply
  • kmmatney - Monday, October 15, 2012 - link

    Drive bender works in Windows 7, and it gives similar features to storage spaces. You can already get MSE Antivirus for free in Windows 7. So far I haven't noticed any less RAM or resource usage compared to Windows 7, while using the preview versions

    They will sell a lot of copies because new systems will be forced to use it.

    what are the improvements in security? The only increased security measured I've heard is that the drivers for anti-malware software will start sooner, compared to win 7, and it has better root-kit protection....
    Reply
  • Belard - Tuesday, October 16, 2012 - link

    A - The memory usage is not much different... the savings done to Win8 are lost with the operation of the bolted on shell called METRO.

    B - What bloat? Start menu uses far less memory than the Start Page. It easy to tweak out the Services to reduce processes.

    C - You've been answered about Storage Spaces (weeee... yawn, fart)

    D - What performance improvements other than its start-up? Whoopdee-doo, with my SSD - WIN7 boots in about 20seconds. But since its so stable, it just goes to SLEEP... takes about 2-3 seconds to wake up. I rarely actually need to reboot my computer.

    E - You rant on AV is hilarious... DOS? Pretty much all OS's are "DOS" They've just dropped the "D". For example, an Apple II or Commodore 64 are not DOS systems as they are functional without any disks.... blah.

    Reality:
    1 - Metro *IS* ugly on the large screen, fine for phones.
    2 - METRO is inefficient and useless since its just a launcher - its live tiles are useless. METRO should be a strip along the left side (2 columns - like WP7) , then its LIVE tiles would have made sense.

    3 - Hiding of buttons that are "still there" is a sign of brain-damaged craziness. Then at the same time - its a "touch based" OS in which the "Start" button is hidden but use keyboard short-cuts shows how Frackin Stupid MS is.

    4 - Win8 has two modes people have to keep track of, METRO and DESKTOP.... wow, avg. Joe won't have fun with that.

    5 - Charms are stupid... again, most of those things were on the START menu and were NOT HIDDEN. Using Win8 - I'd get charms when I DIDN'T want it, then at times- can't quite get the charms to slide out when I (*&#$(&#@ do.

    These are POINTLESS changes that didn't do anything to actually improve the usage of the computer. Windows7 actually did a lot of little improvements over Vista which didn't really function any differently than WinXP.

    Oh yeah...

    The Metro-izing of the Desktop mode is plain U G L Y! Desktop in Win8 Preview 8440 was rather slick improved version of Win7... I liked how it look. In RTM - its flat 80s style ugly crap, what idiot comes up with this?! MS pretty much gave everyone "WIN 7 BASIC" mode... nothing more.

    Are there some good things in Win8? YES!
    But they are not worth it... No doubt about that.
    Reply
  • mcnabney - Tuesday, October 16, 2012 - link

    Shouldn't you be calling Storage Spaces by its original name, Drive Extender. You know, the feature that made WHS what it was and then promptly ripped it out because it was 'too hard to create' under a 64 bit OS? Reply
  • imaheadcase - Tuesday, October 16, 2012 - link

    Again, like i mentioned from last post you said. EVERYTHING you mentioned is available in Win 7.
    1. Antivirus is in win 7 already.
    2. "better" security is still in win 7.
    3. You don't need to use a single peice of AV software, windows malware is very good for majority of users.
    4. Use "less ram" and "much more efficiently"? Benchmarks show its neck and neck vs win7. Using more ram is not even a issue AT ALL.

    You make no argument for it, and more against getting it. lol
    Reply
  • Belard - Tuesday, October 16, 2012 - link

    I have Win8 on a notebook as a dedicated Win8 system...

    Windows 8 isn't worth $1. MS has finally made an OS that is pirate-proof.... nobody wants it.
    Reply
  • GL1zdA - Tuesday, October 16, 2012 - link

    Have you tried using the SkyDrive integration? I used it with Windows 8 + Office 2013 and calling it integration is a overstatement.

    Facebook/Flickr/LinkedIn/Twitter/whatever else integration - what's wrong with using a browser? You already have it open all the time.

    Share and Search charms - we have Send To since Windows 95 and we had search providers for years.

    hardware-accelerated graphic - what? Windows 3.0 did it already.

    DPI-independent graphics - again, we have it since at least Windows 95, but developers never cared about it.

    improved Task Manager - again, have you used it or just launched it? Still had to replace it with MS's own Process Explorer.

    File History - ever heard of "Previous Versions"? We already had it in Vista.
    Reply
  • GL1zdA - Tuesday, October 16, 2012 - link

    Windows To Go is available only in Enterprise edition, so you need a Volume License to get them. The hypervisor sucks if you want to run Linux with GUI (limited resolution). Reply
  • dagamer34 - Monday, October 15, 2012 - link

    I'll be sticking with the download version as I won't have to deal with product keys, the online installer will have it slipstreamed into the installation process for me. Reply
  • kmmatney - Monday, October 15, 2012 - link

    Well - I sent in request to cancel my $59 Pro upgrade from NewEgg. I'd rather just download for $39.

    I wonder if this download version is "retail" or OEM, as I'm really sick of Microsoft accusing me of not using genuine software when I upgrade my hardware. I'm currently using Windows 7 Ultimate 32-bit, wqhich I received free from a Microsoft conference I attended. it doesn't say OEM anywhere on the package, but when I upgraded my motherboard and cpu I had to re-activate it. I upgraded the cpu again, and then it wouldn't even re-activate and I had to call Microsoft to activate. Now if I even just add a hard drive to the system I need to call up. I don't want to keep going through this crap...
    Reply
  • Spivonious - Monday, October 15, 2012 - link

    The download version is the upgrade version. If you upgrade an OEM copy, it is OEM. If you upgrade a retail copy, it's retail. You're basically turning the original license into a Windows 8 license. Reply
  • TormDK - Monday, October 15, 2012 - link

    Thats not how upgrades work though.

    Upgrades are *always* FPP (Retail copies), and as such you are elidible for Microsoft support and all the other goodies that comes from being a Microsoft retail customer.
    Reply
  • kmmatney - Monday, October 15, 2012 - link

    I believe the last upgrade I bought from MS (a windows 7 Home premium upgrade) didn't require a previous version - I installed fresh on a new hard drive. I just want to be able to upgrade my MB + cpu without Windows deactivating itself. Reply
  • Shambolic - Monday, October 15, 2012 - link

    Sadly, I've heard that loop hole has been closed and it must be installed over a previous system, but we'll have to see. Maybe it'll be enough to just show it a previous install disk to get it to work. Reply
  • steven75 - Monday, October 15, 2012 - link

    My favorite is the ads shown in the Metro (Modern) weather app even though you paid for the OS. Reply
  • atata - Monday, October 15, 2012 - link

    I want to know whether they will offer full retail box version.
    I know there's been some information that they won't, and that is not good.
    OEM version basically forbids you from changing motherboard forever according to license. I want actual full version.
    Reply
  • vicbee - Monday, October 15, 2012 - link

    Isn't $39.99 closer to $40 than $39? Reply
  • Belard - Tuesday, October 16, 2012 - link

    Yep! But it seems to fool stupid people! Reply
  • colonelpepper - Monday, October 15, 2012 - link

    Vista --> Win 7 Professional

    that's what i'll be using this "Win 8" upgrade for.
    The upgrade key can be used to activate a Windows 7 License.

    My home theater PC is going to be so nice with Win 7... and for $39 only!!!
    Reply
  • B3an - Monday, October 15, 2012 - link

    Win 8 is FAR better than 7 for a home theatre PC. And if you get the $39.99 upgrade from MS you also get the Windows Media Center add-on for free.

    You'd be a fool to use Win 7. It's slower, uses more RAM and there will definitely be many Win 8 apps for video/media coming. Netflix already have an app.
    Reply
  • Belard - Tuesday, October 16, 2012 - link

    That is only your opinion.

    Uh... other than boot up, in WHAT way is Win7 slower or uses more memory? I just dropped 16GB of RAM into my 1+ week old new WIN7 setup for $80.

    Oh, it came with Media Center on the disc / during install.
    Reply
  • B3an - Tuesday, October 16, 2012 - link

    No it's more a fact.

    Win 7 uses more memory for EVERYTHING as it uses more memory by default. If you have a fresh install of both OS's then get up task manager you'll see that 8 uses considerably less memory and processes. This is well known. With just 1GB RAM win 8 will use roughly 125MB less. With 16GB is will use way less. And with 32GB like i have it uses a ton less than 7.

    http://blogs.msdn.com/b/b8/archive/2011/10/07/redu...

    And 8 is faster at many things, as benchmarks show. Even web browsers perform faster on Win 8. Video acceleration for certain file types also uses less CPU.
    Reply
  • Old_Fogie_Late_Bloomer - Tuesday, October 16, 2012 - link

    http://penny-arcade.com/comic/2001/12/10

    As relevant then as it is now. :-P
    Reply
  • imaheadcase - Tuesday, October 16, 2012 - link

    You have ZERO idea what you are talking about. The benchmarks dont' show it faster than anyone will even know. Its like comparing 150fps to 145fps in a game. Its nill.

    You lost all credit when you said web browsers will perform better.
    Reply
  • ananduser - Tuesday, October 16, 2012 - link

    Win8 vs Win7 in resource management is more visible on lower hardware. On a hardcore PC gamer's desktop the difference is like you said, 150 vs 145 fps. People with older hardware have noticed new life being breathed into their machines. Reply
  • Metaluna - Tuesday, October 16, 2012 - link

    Haven't tried it on my HTPC yet, but I expect the start screen will be much nicer to operate with my Logitech K400 (wireless combo keyboard/touchpad). Navigating the tiny start menu from 10 ft away is not real fun (not that I do it that often). A real Netflix (i.e. non-browser-based) app would be awesome. Reply
  • Shadowmaster625 - Monday, October 15, 2012 - link

    Has anyone figured out a way to do an XP to 8 upgrade, without there being an actual OS installed? ie, Is there a way to upgrade to an SSD the same time you upgrade your OS? It can be done with 7, but maybe it is too much too soon to ask if this can be done with win 8. Reply
  • Etsp - Monday, October 15, 2012 - link

    Do an upgrade without installing an OS? That doesn't make much sense, but I think I get what you meant (maybe)

    From everything I've seen, when you run the Windows 8 Installation process, it gives you an option to do a clean install. I don't see why they wouldn't allow you to choose a different partition for this/drive but it's certainly possible.

    One thing to do would be to change your system's boot settings in BIOS so that your SSD is the device the system looks to for a bootloader, THEN run the Windows 8 install process. I had a heck of a time trying to get Windows 7 to install on a drive before I figured out that Microsoft wouldn't let advanced users Install first, change boot settings later. (I thought using the boot menu would be a good option : /)
    Reply
  • bill4 - Wednesday, October 17, 2012 - link

    But my question is, will you be able to do a clean install with the $39 upgrade version?

    See, I build my own PC's, and in between that and say, buying new SSD's (just replaced my old 40GB SSD with a 128GB Crucial, for example) I find myself reinstalling the OS from scratch frequently. Given that somehow in the past I ended up with a W7 upgrade disc, I already have to do a "workaround" to clean install from it, since theoretically you're not supposed to clean install with upgrade media.

    So basically I'd be looking at: clean install from my W7 upgrade disc (requires workaround), then upgrade with W8, every time I reinstalled my OS.

    If however the $39 W8 has some type of clean install workaround, it would simplify things greatly. I would just clean install W8, and done.

    Anyways, I'd def spring for one if not two of these cheap $39 Windows 8 licenses if you can clean install them. I have a few years old laptop that I dont use much (desktop is my primary), but mainly dont like cause it's sporting Vista. Would be a great opportunity to kill two birds with one stone, put windows 8 on it, no more Vista, and also a chance to check out 8 before deciding whether to make the jump on my desktop.

    So yeah anybody know?
    Reply
  • jed22281 - Sunday, August 18, 2013 - link

    So if one owns a legit copy of Win 7 Ultimate, can we buy a "physical" upgrade kit to Win 8x Ultimate?
    (Or whatever the equivalent of Win 8 Ultimate is, under the new naming schema)
    If so, what is the cost? If it's heap more than $100, I'll seriously struggle to justify the cost.
    Reply

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