Micron P400m Review (200GB)

by Anand Lal Shimpi on 2/13/2013 12:00 AM EST
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23 Comments

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  • philipma1957 - Wednesday, February 13, 2013 - link

    I missed the warranty on this drive was it 3 or 5 years? Reply
  • Beenthere - Wednesday, February 13, 2013 - link

    The warranty doesn't matter much because if you need to use it, you'll get a repaird unit that isn't likely to last 1 year based on many people's experience. The lost data is the real issue for most people...

    For those who don't know, now days a longer product warranty does not decree a better quality product. Products with longer warranty cost more to pay for the longer warranty.
    Reply
  • designerfx - Wednesday, February 13, 2013 - link

    I don't get your point? The point of a warranty is to guarantee performance up to the stated warranty period. That's never been about quality or not. Whether you get a good unit back from warranty is entirely going to be luck of the draw with any manufacturer.

    It's no different in the car industry, Hyundai's 10 year warranty isn't an indicator of quality either.
    Reply
  • peterfares - Wednesday, February 13, 2013 - link

    I think his point is that because its an enterprise drive and because warranty replacements are unreliable, they wouldn't be put into service in an enterprise environment. Reply
  • DuckieHo - Thursday, February 14, 2013 - link

    Why would an enterprise replacement be unreliable? Hardware fails... that's why there's a warranty in the first place.

    Not replacing the drive or using a different drive would absolutely be more risky to uptime.
    Reply
  • JellyRoll - Wednesday, February 13, 2013 - link

    I googled to find more data on this "XPERT NAND" that is mentioned in this article. It actually doesn't exist, though a PDF explains that XPERT is not NAND, it is actual firmware and algorithms. I can't believe Anand missed the mark so badly. Reply
  • Anand Lal Shimpi - Wednesday, February 13, 2013 - link

    It's a combination of NAND binning/tech, firmware and validation. From Micron's reviewer's guide on the P400m:

    "The P400m is built from the ground up with custom 25nm MLC NAND that uses Micron’s extended performance and enhanced reliability technology (XPERT)."
    Reply
  • JellyRoll - Wednesday, February 13, 2013 - link

    Well..that states specifically that it uses XPERT technology but not that the NAND is XPERT NAND.
    For instance, some Marvell SSDs use F.R.A.M.E. technology, but they do not refer to it as F.R.A.M.E. NAND.
    Reply
  • mmonnin03 - Thursday, February 14, 2013 - link

    All the NAND is pretty much the same. The only thing really different with the NAND is binning during probe. A fuse blown here, a fuse blown there. Fab process is the same.

    If its 42GBit chips like the article mentioned then these are the TLC designed chips but only storing 2 bits in a Cell. 2/3 of 64GBit chip = 43GBit.
    Reply
  • JellyRoll - Wednesday, February 13, 2013 - link

    Its weird but I noticed when this article posted that there were already 1,394 likes in the icon above. I come back three hours later and there is the exact same number of likes! It really blew my mind that there would be 1,394 likes in the first five minutes of this article being posted, but now i see that the Like button must be broken :) Reply
  • JarredWalton - Wednesday, February 13, 2013 - link

    I'm not sure what causes it, but periodically when an article posts the Like button is broken and basically "maxes out". I don't know where the 1394 number comes from (not FireWire! Hahaha), but I'll pass the info to John, our web guy, to see if he can do something about it. It was supposed to be fixed.... Reply
  • Beenthere - Wednesday, February 13, 2013 - link

    Tell that to those with the "100 hour crash" syndrome...

    All of the SSD makers have been rushing half-baked products to market for huge profits from gullible consumers duped by the media. With Smasungs SSD and now PC issues, it's pretty safe to conclude that quite a few of the brand name SSD suppliers are cashing in on half-baked crap.
    Reply
  • Death666Angel - Wednesday, February 13, 2013 - link

    Was he saying that they never have issues with their SSDs? No, that's what the "more" indicates (more stable than competition, not absolutely, 100% stable all the time).
    And just because there are issues doesn't mean things are half baked, in my opinion. Everything can have issues, even centuries old technology or stuff they through countless man-hours and money at. I personally owned 3 SSDs (Agility, Vertex2, 840 non-Pro), all working fine to this day. I owned a Samsung laptop, smartphone, tablet, all fine. Am I saying that everything with them is fine? No. But there is no point in being a doom-sayer like you at the moment either.
    Reply
  • Mr Perfect - Wednesday, February 13, 2013 - link

    Don't mind him, he posts something similar in every SSD related article regardless of make or model. Reply
  • Death666Angel - Wednesday, February 13, 2013 - link

    Thanks I'll note his name for ignoring in the future :P. Reply
  • JellyRoll - Wednesday, February 13, 2013 - link

    The whole thing looks great (with the exception of Anand making some very major flaws listing the design of the unit) until the very end where he essentially says, "buy intel", even though they have nowhere near the features of the P5400m. I am wondering how he came to that conclusion. Reply
  • melgross - Wednesday, February 13, 2013 - link

    I don't recall him saying that. He mentioned price performance. This performs somewhat worse than the Intel drive, so he said that if it were less expensive, it would be worth looking at, but that if it were more expensive, then the Intel drive would be a better bet. Since micron's pricing is pretty high, as given, though they told him the pricing was wrong, we don't know the pricing.

    I think his closing remarks were right on the money, so to speak.

    Are you sure you understood what he said?
    Reply
  • Mr Perfect - Wednesday, February 13, 2013 - link

    I'm assuming that the endurance rating "DW" is referring to drive-writes a day? Meaning "10DW x 5 years" is ten complete drive writes a day for five years? Reply
  • Anand Lal Shimpi - Wednesday, February 13, 2013 - link

    Correct, I will clarify in the table.

    Take care,
    Anand
    Reply
  • zeadlots - Wednesday, February 13, 2013 - link

    Is it just me or do the graphs on the second page feature the Samsung 840pro SSD, but the subsequent graphs all have the Samsung SM825. It was my understanding that the 840pro was top 3 on most tests according to another article of yours. Hoping someone can doublecheck this. Reply
  • zeadlots - Wednesday, February 13, 2013 - link

    http://www.anandtech.com/show/6710/intel-ssd-525-r...

    is where the other data is.
    Reply
  • toyotabedzrock - Saturday, February 16, 2013 - link

    Shouldn't the 200gb model have a 3.5 Pb endurance rating? Reply
  • DeepStorage - Sunday, February 17, 2013 - link

    Gents,

    Could you elaborate on what benchmark software you use to collect the IOPS data over time? I have been looking for just such a tool even looking into a custom IOmeter that logged when the screen is updated.

    Howard Marks
    DeepStorage,llc
    Reply

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