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  • cjb110 - Friday, June 07, 2013 - link

    urm what's the point of 4k support, when HDMI can't do it...other than that nice idea. Reply
  • DanNeely - Friday, June 07, 2013 - link

    Follyweird movie content is typically 24/30 fps not 60; HDMI 1.4 has enough bandwidth to do that. However, I think what the article is saying is that it can do realtime transcoding from 4k to 1080p so you only need to store the top quality copy but can watch it on non-4k devices without trouble. Reply
  • Zok - Friday, June 07, 2013 - link

    HDMI 1.4 supports 4K. Been on the Radeon 7XXX and GeForce 6XX/7XX for some time now. Reply
  • ganeshts - Friday, June 07, 2013 - link

    Intel Ivy Bridge could do 4K decode but not 4K output.. This has been well known for quite some time. Basically, QNAP has made sure that the decoder works in the XBMC build for its custom OS.

    No transcoding necessary.. It is 4K decode, and downscale to 1080p.. what a typical Ivy Bridge PC can do.

    Readeon 7xxx (at least 7750 and greater) and GeForce 640 and greater support 4K over HDMI.
    Reply
  • colinstu - Friday, June 07, 2013 - link

    What's stopping someone from swapping that CPU out with one that DOES feature AES-NI? ;) Reply
  • DanNeely - Friday, June 07, 2013 - link

    The warranty. Honestly though since these aren't entry level nases I'm not sure why they don't just spend the extra $50 for an i5 with AES-NI support. Reply
  • Kevin G - Friday, June 07, 2013 - link

    It could be soldered on to the motherboard and thus be non-replaceable. Reply
  • DanNeely - Friday, June 07, 2013 - link

    The 3220 is an LGA 1155 desktop processor; only (some of) Intel's mobile/mobile derived chips are available in BGA packages suitable for soldering to the mobo. Reply
  • Veroxious - Friday, June 07, 2013 - link

    So why not just offer a model with a CPU that does support AES-NI? Reply

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