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  • EzioAs - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    I knew something was wrong when I saw the benchmarks and the GTX 780M was lower than the GTX 680M. Single fan. What were they thinking? I'd say just drop the RAID SSDs, lower the amount of RAM to 16GB and focus on a more terrific cooling. RAID SSDs and more than absurd amount of RAM isn't required for gaming.

    Sadly, it's just as you said Dustin, their "feature set" solution is the main attraction. A lot of people who spend tons on a gaming notebook (especially the less informed) would probably buy these just because it has more features even though it's reliability/usability goes down the drain.
    Reply
  • axien86 - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    It turns out both system builders AND OEMS were surprised that Intel overhyped and overpromised on the thermal performance characteristics of Haswell.

    First article to report this was PCPro UK: "Intel Haswell is hotter and slower than expected."

    Second article by TheVerge: Can Intel deliver on Haswell Hype? Many OEMs interviewed indicate that Haswell does not mostly deliver on Intel's promise and claims.

    http://www.theverge.com/2013/6/13/4426360/massive-...
    Reply
  • EzioAs - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    That's one thing. But just because they didn't get the promised thermal performance doesn't mean they should keep the poor cooling design. They did test products before it's released so they should know about the heat issues. I'm guessing they've decided to skip redesign and just let this model sell for it's features alone since not a lot of people read reviews, most of them just look at the specs and features. I'm very disappointed with MSIs decision in this matter.

    Their video cards coolers are one of the best (Twin Frozr and Cyclone are great), so you'd think you can expect something similar in one of their gaming laptops.
    Reply
  • xdrol - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    They did not start the design of this laptop when the first tests of Haswell arrived, rather they started on whatever Intel promised. If Haswell were supercool as promised, then a one-fan design would be good enough (making space for... 3x SSD raid for instance). Reply
  • mczak - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    intel didn't overpromise. Sure everybody was somewhat expecting better perf/w but pretty much the only thing intel really promised was lower idle power. Besides, the TDP numbers were set ages ago and I haven't seen anything that they are off (yes turbo can exceed TDP but that's nothing new and clearly stated how it works in the datasheets). Plus it wouldn't really make a difference anyway as the cpu is only responsible for less than a third of the thermal budget of the cpu+gpu combo. (I have however no idea if the gtx780m itself is worse than what OEMs were expecting, at the very least I'd not be surprised there, because the gtx680mx was a imac exclusive because it exceeded the "usual" 100W TDP figure for mobile chips, and the gtx780m which is pretty much the same chip is in fact clocked higher AND supposedly is now using "only" 100W - unfortunately there's no power figures in this review compared to the older 680m which could help answer this.) Reply
  • Sabresiberian - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    No, they slapped in components in an existing design that was already flawed. And, the major source of heat isn't the CPU, it's the GPU - CPU intensive performance that didn't use much GPU power was fine, it was only in apps where the GPU really needed to kick it up a notch, and the CPU also needed to supply top power, that the CPU throttled. Obvious conclusion: main source of throttling heat was the GPU, and it was woefully, badly, cooled, meaning the whole system was badly cooled.

    It was improperly cooled when the 680 part was in, and it's worse now.

    And, I don't recall Intel ever saying that every CPU with the "Haswell" name on it would be low powered. The whole design is a step in the direction of achieving lower power, but the real low-powered parts are those intended for smaller, lighter form factors, not full-blown gaming notebooks.
    Reply
  • Sabresiberian - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    You missed the part in the article where OEMs said it was their adaptation of the Haswell CPUs that would slow down the proper adaptation of the lower powered SKUs, not Haswell itself. As per usual, most of them waited until the CPU was released to even think about new design considerations. Seriously, what's up with that?

    The major problem in the PC industry is that manufacturers have largely based their increases in sales by what Microsoft and Intel did; a new OS or new CPU used to mean new sales - but what if one or both of these companies takes a new direction, and OEMs don't take advantage of it? Lower sales and bad products is what happens. MSI has only itself to blame for the failures of this "could have been great" notebook.
    Reply
  • alcalde - Thursday, June 27, 2013 - link

    >would probably buy these just because it has more features even though it's reliability/usability
    >goes down the drain.

    It doesn't "go down the drain" at all. It's still plenty fast enough to play almost every mainstream title at 1080p and high settings. Whether some other system gets 2 or 3 FPS higher on a particular game is really irrelevant.

    >RAID SSDs and more than absurd amount of RAM isn't required for gaming.

    Most people spending this kind of money are looking for more than a portable X-Box; they want a laptop they can use for demanding applications and be a desktop replacement. A desktop is more than a GPU.
    Reply
  • TheinsanegamerN - Thursday, July 11, 2013 - link

    yeah, those other laptops that run 2-3 fps faster? they also run 15-20c cooler without 50db of noise. they are better designed for the work they are doing. and raid ssds are useless for gaming. games are big, and id rather have a cache ssd and a big hdd for games. or a single big ssd. same deal with ram. if you actually need that much ram, you shouldn't be buying a gaming notebook. Reply
  • wdfmph - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    Thanks for the review. I'm sure it's good. The test on Intel Core i7-4700MQ is absolutely necessary and it is the first review of the processor I have ever seen.

    I just don't get the concept of "gaming laptop". It's so against the general trend for a laptop, which calls for a thinner, lighter and more durable ones. For me it's ridiculous to carry around an 8 lbs "back breaker" and play 2 hour game on a small screen. Get a desktop maybe way better for PC gamers. Or get an console at 10% of the price of this beast.

    I would really appreciate if anandtech can have a test on the new slim laptops, such as vaio pro 11/13, new Acer S7, or asus zenbook infinity.
    Reply
  • NA1NSXR - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    Maybe some of us can't have a desktop, which is kind of the point of the segment. Not everyone is anchored down to a town, a state, or even a country. For me, someone who was accustomed to powerful desktops, resorting to a laptop for everything I need a computer to do was hard, but it had to be done after taking a job overseas. Thanks to this segment, I have preserved all of the functionality of my desktop with reasonable performance. The big chassis allows these machines to be overclocked to decent speeds. My Ivy Bridge is running at 3.8GHz on 4 cores and 4GHz on 1, and my 680M runs at 967MHz on load, all with excellent temperatures. I would say I salvaged a good 80% of my desktop performance after being forced on to a laptop and on a day to day basis this is quite acceptable. If this segment did not exist my situation would require a huge compromise in my computing experience, so these "back breakers" are far from ridiculous to me. Reply
  • wdfmph - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    Yes, for people constantly on their way to somewhere and needs tons of computing power, it make sense. Reply
  • Dustin Sklavos - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    Just because you don't understand a concept doesn't mean it intrinsically has no value. I don't personally like ultrabooks at all, but I recognize their appeal and purpose, and I recognize why they exist.

    What you need to understand is that the traditional notebook is effectively being put out to pasture. Entry-level computing is going to be done with tablets and convertibles in not too long, ultrabooks are going to be for actual portable computing, and for high performance mobile computing, gaming laptops and mobile workstations will persist. There are a million reasons to go with just a laptop; my M17x R3 goes with me to friends' houses frequently to game, and on trips it's a good substitute for a full on desktop.

    Also consider that PC gaming is enjoying a bit of a resurgence in popularity right now. We cover what we're sent, and the GTX 780M especially is worth covering.
    Reply
  • wdfmph - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    I understand there's a niche market for gaming laptop and personally I liked the design of the already dead Voodoo PC. I like pay games on PC. I'm happy to see many AAA PC games coming out. With all due respect, gaming laptop is good for hardcore gamers like you to carry around. It better than carrying a huge computer case to attend a LAN party.

    I wish someday I could only take my phone and ipad to go to work. However, if I try that tomorrow, or someday next year, I am basically fooling around at office. A new Surface pro might be something close try, but with a price and weight like that, many might just opt for an "traditional" notebook such as Macbook air or slim ultrabook. Tablets and convertibles are making attempts to substitute notebooks in some way, but to be successful, serious efforts are needed from silicon to software.I don't see that will happen soon.
    Reply
  • RAWRscary - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    Amazing how narrow of a view you have. Reply
  • Flunk - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    I actually own both a "gaming" laptop and a desktop system. The laptop is useful when out and about and good enough for a game on the go, but I mostly bought it for software development because it was cheaper than a mobile workstation. The one I have is a little smaller (6.5lbs) but I don't find the weight or size unmanageable. As long as it fits in the backpack I'm good. Reply
  • BobBobson - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    Yes wdfmph, that is right!

    And I dont understand those queer African types who walk 10 miles every morning just to fetch some water from the well. Why don't they just go to their kitchens and turn on the cold water tap!? Idiots!
    Reply
  • ickibar1234 - Saturday, June 29, 2013 - link

    Gaming laptops now days aren't just for gamers, they are for Engineers and computer enthusiasts. GPUs can do so much more than just rendering these days. Also the ability to put in an Extreme CPU years down the road for cheap is a great deal. Reply
  • skiboysteve - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    Thanks for the review. Good to see people using the haswell quads. Too bad this one sucks.

    I really want a thin and light laptop with the 4900MQ or 4950HQ and no discrete graphics. Just a work laptop CPU powerhouse. Only 47W to dissipate with no graphics to worry about. Why doesn't anyone build this? I would buy it for work today!
    Reply
  • Flunk - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    There are actually a few options for a quad-core Haswell without discrete graphics. Look at business-class systems like Thinkpads, Dell Lattitude or maybe HP's Elitebooks. Reply
  • skiboysteve - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    I got excited at your comment but I looked, there is nothing. Not a single laptop from Lenovo, Dell, or HP with Haswell and no discrete graphics. Reply
  • peterfares - Wednesday, June 19, 2013 - link

    Haswell JUST came out. Give it a month or two. Business machines usually take a little longer than the consumer ones to refresh. Reply
  • ZeDestructor - Wednesday, June 19, 2013 - link

    Ane one might argue for good reason too.... I have yet to see a proper ThinkPad, Latitude or Precision machine overheat... Reply
  • TheinsanegamerN - Thursday, July 11, 2013 - link

    system 67 has a laptop with the 4750hq and iris pro graphics. Reply
  • SirGCal - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    This would be a laptop I would enjoy. Something I could take with me to my trips to the hospital crossed country when I have to go, but still let me game in the evenings. Granted have to be plugged in for any length of time but... My problem is just the costs. For that type of money I can build one hell of another desktop or even lanbox... I really wish that the 'build your own laptops' would take off to make that market more price competitive instead of this 'gotcha' market it is now... Reply
  • SirGCal - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    Well, that would be in theory ofcorse... if it could keep itself cool... Reply
  • TheinsanegamerN - Thursday, July 11, 2013 - link

    check out rjtech. plenty of choices there Reply
  • alexvoda - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    I would like if someone at Anandtech could test the Gigabyte P27K
    http://www.gigabyte.eu/products/product-page.aspx?...

    AFAIK it is the only notebook that has one feature I like very much: the combo USB3.0/eSATAp port.
    Reply
  • Bob Todd - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    Thanks for the review. Any chance there are some new 14" gaming laptop reviews in the pipeline? Specifically the Alienware 14 and Razer Blade 14? I've been travelling quite a bit lately and am contemplating something like one of those to help pass the time on the long international flights. Hell I'm even curious to see if the new 13" MBA can play some current games at 900p or 800p @ medium settings with GT3 graphics. Reply
  • Dustin Sklavos - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    Trying to secure them. Thankfully we have pretty good relationships with both vendors, so it shouldn't be a question of "if," but "when." Reply
  • TheinsanegamerN - Thursday, July 11, 2013 - link

    the clevo w230st is 13 inch with the hardware power of a fully upgraded alienware 14. and way cheaper too. Reply
  • kallogan - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    INTEL HASFAIL Reply
  • hellfish - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    if you read the story its msi fan fail. To quote "Haswell is certainly faster clock for clock" Reply
  • ZeDestructor - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    Optical Drive TSSTCorp SN-506BB Blu-ray writer

    Chuck this out and you have all the space you need for cooling. While keeping room for another HDD or mSATA/mPCI-E SSD Cluster. Seriously, optical media needs to die. ASAP!
    Reply
  • Darkstone - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    Dustin, you have to be careful detecting clock speeds. Furmark is the only tool i know that correctly detects graphics card throtteling in every case. For an example, see http://www.notebookcheck.net/fileadmin/Notebooks/S... taken from http://www.notebookcheck.net/Review-Schenker-XMG-P... GPU-z thinks that the GPU is happily running at it's max clock speeds. This is obviously not the case.

    On the CPU side, CPU-z seems to be unable to detect throtteling in all cases with haswell. See http://www.notebookcheck.net/fileadmin/Notebooks/S... taken from http://www.notebookcheck.net/Review-Schenker-XMG-P... CPU-z states the CPU runs at 2.8Ghz, so does Intel turbo boost monitor. Yet Hardware Monitor measures a package power of 12.63w. No way that is possible on that clock speeds while running 8 threads on prime95. I have personally tested an i7-3820QM under prime95 and it draws around 45W @ 3.2Ghz. Haswell shouldn't be that much more power efficient under load.
    Reply
  • MrSpadge - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    Or the power reading is wrong?

    Crunching BOINC on my HD4000 results in 12 -14 W reported power draw, depending on clock speeds. Yet at the wall I'm drawing 16 - 32 W (1150 - 1350 MHz with adjusted voltage), so it seems those reading simply do not factor supply voltage in, which seems perplexing.
    Reply
  • Darkstone - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    The maximum power draw of the HD 3000 is around 12w, or 20w with furmark, those results are not surprising. Intel uses the same sensor to determine when to throttle the processor. My i7-2820QM runs around 2.6Ghz when all 8 threads are stressed, consuming 45w. Under lighter loads the processor still consumes 45w on higher clock speeds.

    I usually use the Package Power sensor to determine whether the processor is throttling instead of the clock speeds.
    Reply
  • Paapaa125 - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    Please include units to upper battery life charts. "229"? Points? Minutes? Hours? What? Reply
  • Meaker10 - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    The fan draws air from the bottom vents (not directly under the fan) and from the keyboard and blows it out the back and side at the same time. It does not suck air through either heatsink.

    The paste job on your cpu likley needed redoing.
    Reply
  • Meaker10 - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    Further cooler boost takes your cpu temps down to 86 at which point you should not see any throttle.The issue may actually be the 180w brick at thwt point. Reply
  • MrSpadge - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    When the GPU is pumping 100+ W into those tiny heatsinks, the CPU has to be cooled by some seriously hot air. It's actually almost a heatpipe-miracle that this tiny fan manages to keep things running at all. Reply
  • JBVertexx - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    That thing looks like a laptop right out of the 1990's - probably the ugliest, gaudiest looking laptop I've seen in a long time.

    You have to wonder, though, if thermal performance is going to be a common issue with these Haswell systems. If it's true that system builders were provided CPUs that produced much less heat than the actual production versions, then what do they do? You've designed your system, lined up your supply chain, and then the CPU's are now producing more heat than your design spec allowed for. I can see the "Max Fan" button being a last minute addition as a way around this issue.

    Even so, my Dell Latitude has a better designed cooling system than this Laptop. MSI looks like they tried to cut corners based on the Haswell promise and got bit.

    It really is typical MSI though, all gaudy "style" and no substance.
    Reply
  • TheinsanegamerN - Thursday, July 11, 2013 - link

    i think it was a msi problem. clevo laptops with haswell, the asus laptop with haswell, and the sager models with haswell dont have this issue. only msi does. Reply
  • huaxshin - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    This review is a bust. I just knew it, from the time it took to make this review.

    The game benchmarks you did is nothing short but plain BS.
    1080p benchmarks.

    TES Skyrim:
    Anandtech: GTX 780M 18% slower than GTX 680M.
    Notebookcheck: GTX 780M 26% faster than GTX 680M.
    Notebookit: GTX 780M 21% faster than GTX 680M.

    StarCraft 2:
    Anandtech: GTX 780M is 12% slower than GTX 680M.
    Sadly nobody else have tested it. Nvidia got +20% with the 780M over the GTX 680M. Pretty much logical. 12% slower? Give me a break

    Tomb Raider:
    Anandtech: GTX 780M is 3% slower than GTX 680M
    Notebookcheck: GTX 780M is 102% faster than GTX 680M.

    I won`t even bother going through the benchmarks where the GTX 780M leads, but its most likely very inaccurate as pretty much every game benchmark in your test.

    Source: Notebookcheck and Notebookreview

    I previously used Anandtech as a source for information about mobile products, but seeing that you can`t even review a product properly, this site goes far down my must-read list.
    I`m actually sick in my stomach that you guys messed up this much with a new flagship GPU.

    You ought to be ashamed of yourself for not double checking your data before pushing out a BS review like this one. You numbers doesn`t make any sense at all.
    Reply
  • kogunniyi - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    Did you even read the review? That was the point... Reply
  • kogunniyi - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    I'll spell it out: the GTX 780m is underperforming in the MSI. Reply
  • huaxshin - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    No its not. Go read the GT70 review on Notebookcheck.
    They had no CPU throttling OR any performance issues with the GTX 780M

    This review should be deleted and redone.
    Reply
  • kogunniyi - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    OK, I came on a bit too strong. The results in the review are bizarre, but they do provide reason to pause: we have no guarantee that the MSI's cooling system can handle a heavy CPU/GPU OC over a long time. The bridge doesn't help much during a load that stresses the CPU and GPU. Notebookcheck reported throttling and up to 90C for the CPU and GPU.

    Of course, my thoughts might be misplaced, and the issue might be the 180W power supply.
    Reply
  • huaxshin - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    That is plain wrong.

    The thermal capacity inside the GT70 is more than capable of cooling the 4700MQ and the GTX 780M. Visit Notebookreview forum and read reviews from owners of GT70, or read any other reviews on the internet. Nobody have these high temperatures when gaming.

    The temperatures in the Notebookcheck review is when they are running Prime95 and Furmark. Not remotely close to any scenario a user will EVER encounter.
    The temperatures when using it is much lower.
    Reply
  • BobBobson - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    Blah Blah Blah........

    Why don't you go cash in your MSI company pay cheques you paid shill.

    This review is equivocal with my and many other peoples experiences with the new GT70 Haswell notebooks. Why would Anandtech dishonestly smear a product of a major computer tech manufacturer? For the same reason you and your type scour the internet talking a sweet game about every bit of excrement that comes out MSI's back-end?

    If there was a bit more honesty on the internet when it comes to tech products, people would have a lot less hassles in their lives and the world would be a better place. I commend Anandtech on this honest GT70 review, the first honest review I have seen,
    Reply
  • TheinsanegamerN - Thursday, July 11, 2013 - link

    the notebook review showed throttling. its been well established this machine has some serious thermal problems. Reply
  • Darkstone - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    Prime95 is far from 'Not remotely close to any scenario an user will even encounter'. All threaded applications i have personally written reach the 45W TDP limit without problems on my i7-2820QM. Which is exactly the amount of power that the processor will sustain even if the core is held at sub-zero temperatures.

    Notebookcheck measures massive throtteling under prime95 + furmark with the GT70: the CPU reports under 1/4th the package power it should, the GPU downlocks to 587Mhz the second prime95 starts.

    Remember: the M17x has no problems with simultaneous CPU and GPU load, even with prime95 and furmark. The GPU doesn't even reach 70° (with HD 7970m) without throttling. That seems like an unusual scenario, but not until you factor in dust or warmer climates. A notebook should not throttle on a stress test from day 1.
    Reply
  • huaxshin - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    In fact, Notebookcheck bragged about how the cooling have improved from the older GT70 series, now with the new bridge between the CPU and the GPU. Both thermal wise and noise wise. Reply
  • huaxshin - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    And now to your temperature measurements.

    Since Dragon Edition is basically a GT70 with red colour, you can compare this review against Notebookcheck`s own review of GT70 with GTX 780M. Exact same hardware as this review, 4700MQ.

    In Notebookcheck`s Extreme test, with Furmark and Prime95 running simultanously, they got 92C Max for the CPU and 93C for the GPU. Since Furmark and Prime95 is a benchmark that push the GPU and CPU to the absurd extremeness that nobody will EVER encounter with this notebook, the temperatures when gaming will be MUCH lower. Notebookcheck ran the fan without the turbo mode.

    Anandtech however got 98C for the CPU when just gaming?!

    Bad paste job from the factory maybe? A respectable reviewer should understand that no OEM would ever put components in a notebook that run on 98C. Didn`t any alarm ring in your head that something isn`t right here when watching the temperature skyrocket?

    I`m so dissappointed in you guys. You did everything wrong in this review. I just hope you didn`t test the games without the turbo fan on.
    Reply
  • huaxshin - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    Not just was this a spit in your fan base with a poor review, this was a mockery of MSI`s flagship notebook as well as Nvidia`s newest GPU, GTX 780M. Reply
  • ZeDestructor - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    "Bad paste job from the factory maybe? A respectable reviewer should understand that no OEM would ever put components in a notebook that run on 98C. Didn`t any alarm ring in your head that something isn`t right here when watching the temperature skyrocket?"

    Then their QC is so bad they can't send reviewers a cherry picked, top quality sample (evey single company does this, and it's public knowledge at this point). If the top units they send to reviewers has QC issues, what about the mass production version? No thanks, I'll stick to my Clevos and Alienwares for gaming laptops, and ThinkPad/Precision for mobile workstation. At least don't have WC issues on review units...

    On the other hand, I am curious as to why they didn't ask MSI about it... Most companies usually follow up by sending another review unit and fixing WC for mass production...

    Finally, 98°C isn't as high as laptops can go.. I used to game on a laptop that ran steady at 102°C. Granted, the poor HSF module was cooling beyond its limits (GPU swap), but it ran fine.
    Reply
  • huaxshin - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    The point is, the temperatures SCREAM bad paste job or something other with the cooling system that is not normal.
    "Cooler Boost 2" is MSI`s newest improvement in this notebook. It bridge the CPU and the GPU together to create a huge heatsink. So the thermal capacity have improved. Which you clearly see in the other review I mentioned.

    Anandtech should have never posted this review, but asked MSI to get a new notebook from them, or repasted the CPU themselves. You don`t put out a review of a product which is not functioning correctly like it should.

    Go read user reviews on Notebookreview forum. Nobody have any high temperatures gaming.
    Reply
  • Dustin Sklavos - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    ""Cooler Boost 2" is MSI`s newest improvement in this notebook."

    Phrasing like that is aaawwwwwwful suspect.
    Reply
  • huaxshin - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    Right, so you have nothing to counter all my arguments with?
    I cannot believe you pushed out this review and thought 98C for the CPU is what the engineers at MSI have considered normal. Or that people should be forced to use the Turbo fan mode.

    Jarred Walton would be much better at dealing with reviews like this. Looks to me like you rushed out this review just to post something new to show.
    Anandtech just fell many places down as a reputable reviewer site.

    I know the difference between "Cooler Boost 1" and "Cooler Boost 2" thank you. Its much easier to write "Cooler Boost 2" than "a new copper bridge between the CPU and the GPU to spread out the heat more between the two. And therefor not have the CPU to run much hotter than the GPU, forcing the fan to go up in speed"

    ;)
    Reply
  • Dustin Sklavos - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    Except that the CPU actually runs fine and doesn't throttle when the 780M isn't in use.

    I review what I'm sent. The system I was sent has serious thermal issues with the CPU and there's no reason a 180W PSU shouldn't be able to handle this hardware. I've spoken to contacts in the industry that have seen a high amount of variance in the quality of these units and I may very well have gotten a lemon, but that doesn't actually change whether or not the system can be recommended, does it?

    The cooling system MSI employs is inferior to the one employed in the Alienware M17x, likely the Alienware 17, and in Clevo units, full stop. Almost every other gaming notebook in this class has separate thermal zones for the CPU and the GPU for a reason.

    And I absolutely believe engineers would consider 98C for a CPU core to be normal. Did you not see the first generation Razer Blade? I've reviewed enough notebooks to know that some vendors will let the CPU cook if it means hitting specific design targets, whether it's acoustics, or form factor, or what have you. The GT70 is actually pretty quiet under normal load, but again, probably because the CPU is roasting itself.
    Reply
  • huaxshin - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    I used to own a GT70. It had GTX 680M and i7 3610QM. The components reached maybe max 72C after gaming for many hours. So I`m raising big question about this review since the thermal capacity have improved along with a GPU with slightly higher Core count.

    And the fact that you got HIGHER temperatures than Notebookcheck when they pushed the GPU and the CPU to the very limit by using artificial benchmarks like Prime95 and Furmark. Programs known to have killed a dozen of systems because of the stress they put on the components.

    How do you explain that?

    I absolutely believe you got a notebook with some crappy paste job. And that caused the game tests you have to show a incorrect picture of the newest GTX 780M as well as MSIs own notebook. I hope you have contacted MSI to get a new system or atleast some explanation, because what this review shows is not normal.

    Nor is fair to compare Razer, very thin notebook with low end components, with a pure gaming notebook, which is very thick, and have the industries biggest fan to cool off the components. Which you failed to write about in the review. Its not just 1 fan, but a big one.

    180W PSU is also more than enough, shown by internal tests by resellers I know. It even allows overclocking. The CPU throttling didn`t come from lack of power, it came from bad temperatures.
    Reply
  • huaxshin - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    Time to redo the review. For the sake of Anandtech as well as MSIs reputation.

    imo
    Reply
  • ZeDestructor - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    "I used to own a GT70. It had GTX 680M and i7 3610QM. The components reached maybe max 72C after gaming for many hours. So I`m raising big question about this review since the thermal capacity have improved along with a GPU with slightly higher Core count."

    Did you read the review? The older model CLEARLY had a different cooling design. Like, 2 fans vs 1. On opposite ends of the chassis.
    Reply
  • huaxshin - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    Eh, no. MSI have never had 2 fans.

    And yes, the older model had a different cooling design. A worse one.
    Reply
  • ZeDestructor - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    Actually, I take that back, here's the old model: http://cdn.goodgearguide.com.au/dimg/700x700/dimg/...

    as you may notice: SEPERATE heatpipes. Somehow they didn't account for the VRMs moving on chip.... Gee, maybe they should've paid attention when Intel announced quite proudly that Haswell would have integrated VRMs. and started redesigning there and then.

    The 680M is a cut-down, lower power version of the 780M too, so naturally it will run cooler.
    Reply
  • BobBobson - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    Gee Whizz....

    Are you still pumping your gums about this?

    Call the MSI secret police and hit squad, a negative review has hit the interweb...how dare they!
    Reply
  • Darkstone - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    It's unfair to compare the temperatures of notebookcheck vs anandtech, because notebookcheck measured quite serve throtteling issues as well. The CPU was basely running at 1/4th of the designed power consumption. It's clearly in the screenshots, yet the reviewer didn't even mention it. Reply
  • mercutiouk - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    I notice our shill doesn't respond to this. Reply
  • ZeDestructor - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    "And I absolutely believe engineers would consider 98C for a CPU core to be normal."

    As an engineering student who used to run an old acer at an idle of 85+°C and load of 102°C (with the bottom panel completely off), I know exactly what you mean. Sometimes constraints happen and stuff like this gets forced through QA and validation. Someone in marketing probably wanted a quieter machine, so the engineers tried something proven in a rather new way: single heatsink with a single giant fan. While the concept is great, it really needs more refinement. See the old Dell Precision M4400 (quad-core with top-end Quadro FX parts) for single-fan setups done right. ish. They probably run quite a bit hotter than my E6500 ¬_¬

    Since I got my desktop, my priorities regarding laptops have changed, so I rock an awesome little X220 tablet for uni/mobile work. with a much more reasonable 40-75°C range. I can make it hit 97°C using IBT, but IBT is a pretty special little torture test, much like FurMark.

    Talking of which, you guys should review convertible tablet PCs and more enterprise laptops that aren't HP Elitebooks. There's a severe lack of ThinkPad and Latitude reviews around here :(
    Reply
  • cjl - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    The fact of the matter is, the test sample (which I would tend to think would be tested pretty heavily before it was sent out to a reviewer) had a woefully inadequate cooling system. Whether it was a bad thermal paste job (possible), or simply the fact that they were trying to cool a combined ~150W of TDP with a single small fan (more likely IMHO). Look at the Alienware design - two separate thermal systems, one for the CPU with a similar fan to the one in the MSI, and one significantly thicker fan with a different design (more similar to the blowers on high-end video cards) for the GPU, along with 3 dedicated heatpipes for the GPU and 2 for the CPU. The MSI design has two dedicated heatpipes for each, and one shared heatpipe (and I'm skeptical how useful a shared heatpipe would be, regardless of what kind of fancy marketing-speak MSI uses to describe it), all cooled by a single fan that looks similar to the Alienware's CPU fan alone.

    Would improved TIM help? It would probably be good for a couple of degrees, but I doubt it would reduce the CPU temps to acceptable levels. The simple fact is, a modern high-end gaming notebook should have multiple fans to provide optimal cooling, and this notebook falls short in that area. As for whether the computer would have been designed for that? A surprising number of modern notebooks have overheating problems at full load (due to the competing constraints of form factor, appearance, marketing, and component placement), and it's therefore much more plausible (to me) that MSI really did botch the cooling system design than that Anandtech is incompetent (given past reviews).
    Reply
  • darkhawk1980 - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    Dustin,

    I realize that this is straight out of the box, but I highly suggest checking out MSI's own forums. There should be an electronic controller firmware you can flash that removes the throttling problem that is present in these notebooks.

    I personally have one of the older GT70 0NE laptops with a GTX680M, and I can safely say that mine will trounce this notebook. This is because once the throttling issue is resolved, it's possible to run the GTX680M core at 950 MHz without any issues.

    And while I do find turning on the fan to maximum while gaming, I think you're really putting the noise issue as being too high of a problem. It's not nearly that bad. I actually made a custom cooler for my GT70 simply because I wanted better cooling, and this custom cooling allows me to game at 950MHz without the maximum fan setting.

    Honestly, the GT70 is a great notebook for the price with the super raid feature. It's perhaps not as 'nice' as an alienware, but it can compete easily, and for a good bit less money. Keep in mind, you are comparing the last generation hardware in the alienware, to the current/new generation hardware in the MSI. Of course the prices are going to be the same.....Compare the new alienware and realize that the price will now be $500 more than the MSI for the same features, possibly even less. MSI has again, priced it very competitively against the competition. It's the whole reason I bought a GT70 instead of an Alienware.
    Reply
  • kogunniyi - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    The author hasn't written "Alienware is better than MSI" or "Alienware provides better value for the money than MSI." Why do you define your MSI against Alienware?

    MSI is MSI, and Alienware is Alienware. A negative review is not a reason to justify your purchase to anyone else.
    Reply
  • huaxshin - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    He doesn`t need a new firmware. He need to remove the bad paste job and redo it.
    All CPUs no matter what model will throttle at 98C.
    Reply
  • BobBobson - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    OMG..

    shut up, please!

    If you are happy with your GT70 then great, why dont you go away and just be happy about it cos there are plenty here who aren't.
    Reply
  • huaxshin - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    "Plenty here who aren't"

    I see you moved to Anandtech to whine more about your notebook. For those who doesn't know, this is the Only guy from notebookreview who had any problems with his GT70 and cried about it instead of sending it in.
    Yes many here who complain about it. Only you just like in NBR.
    Reply
  • JBVertexx - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    Your ranting is actually making MSI look worse - it's pretty obvious from your rants that you have some sort of personal ax to grind. Really, perhaps you should do as BobBobson suggested. Reply
  • huaxshin - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    Yes because I work for MSI and represent them.

    lol
    Reply
  • BobBobson - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    Yes, you do. And you are paranoid as well. If you don't actually work for MSI, then what the hell are you doing rabidly defending this company as though it were your dear old mom who was getting slighted? Reply
  • mercutiouk - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    As we have a paid shill here, could you possibly get in touch with the european branch of the MSI repairs?
    Hitachi drive fails, sent back - came back from repair with a different power supply. This didn't fit the socket on the back snugly.

    Come a warm summer the arcing between badly fitting power plug and power pin resulted in the socket basically melting. Sent back. "Customer damage". It took threat of forum posts detailing exactly how poor your service treatment in Europe was to get a "ok, we've approved it - this one occasion only".
    5 months later... the hard drive fails again. The laptops now got 1 hitachi and 1 WD blue, in a raid-0...

    I can well believe the review here. Notebookcheck or no, you screwed up your flagship product. I think more reviews will show this to be true.
    Reply
  • mercutiouk - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    Didn't make clear but this was on a GX660-R Reply
  • huaxshin - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    And how is this relevant? A) you can find the most reliable notebook and still find people with problems. B) GX-660 is an old model. OEMs tend to progress with quality as the gain more experience Reply
  • huaxshin - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    Just read your post now.

    How is it MSI fault that someone else hardware fails?
    And how is it MSI fault that you continued to use a PSU with power connector for a different product even though you noticed yourself they didnt fit like it should?
    Reply
  • ZeDestructor - Wednesday, June 19, 2013 - link

    Said PSU was sent back by MSI. Therefore THEY should have checked that they were sending correct parts back. Plenty of small changes happen during manufacturing silently. This could be one of them., More QC fails.. No thanks, so many other companies do much, much better... Reply
  • fanofanand - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    I've been reading this site for over 5 years and have never been compelled to register until I read these comments. Dustin has done an admirable job with this review and huaxshin is clearly a paid shill. Never have I seen someone so adamantly defend something they didn't have a vested interest in, and I have no doubt that this case is no exception. People complain that Anand is too cozy with Intel, too nice to Nvidia, too hard on AMD etc. Readers here are CONSTANTLY looking for bias and here comes an honest open review and Dustin has been slandered repeatedly claiming the review is bogus etc.

    Why on earth should Dustin have to modify the laptop to review it??? A reviewer should NEVER alter a product during the course of a review. A buyer shouldn't be expected to do so, in fact it would void the warranty. If this is how MSI is shipping their product, then that's exactly what should be reviewed. Huaxshin you need to get out of here with your trash and go back to Tom's Hardware where reviews are regularly bought. Anand has higher standards and has been a positive force of change within the industry.

    Dustin I applaud your honesty and candor with this review, it's refreshing to see somebody call out a company that has poor QC or in this case, bad design. Kudos!
    Reply
  • huaxshin - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    Its not about modifying anything. Its about giving your partners, who send you a free sample, a chance to respond or resend a proper unit, before posting it online.

    Not spitting in their face first, then using a towel to clean up after MSI have discovered the fault.
    I would have understood it if it was a different error like keyboard malfunction, or any other poor designed part of the notebook. But not a clearly faulty notebook not functioning like it should.

    Which is clearly the case here because there is no chance MSI designed this system to run at 98C, which not only is too hot for comfort, but will also cause the CPU to throttle and not perform like it should.

    MSI is not this stupid, to push out a system like that. It doesnt make any sense
    Reply
  • JBVertexx - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    You're wrong - this is typical MSI - pure garbage, cheap, gaudy, cheesy junk. I made the mistake of buying an MSI motherboard, once, before I started paying attention to substantial reviews such as this. MSIs style is to pack product full of feature-set bullet points that they hope to appeal those ignorant consumers in the market, but in reality, turn out to have zero substantial value to the overall product.

    MSI - pure trailer-park-trash junk.
    Reply
  • JBVertexx - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    And huaxshin, you are only adding to that trailer-park-trash image by evidence of your ignorant rants throughout this forum. Reply
  • JarredWalton - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    Let me just chime in by saying I have an MSI GX60 with A10-4600M. I know it's a different laptop, but it warrants mention simply for the fact that it too appears to have performance issues. A10-4600M is no i7, certainly, but in many cases I'm getting performance that's closer to what I'd expect from the integrated HD 7660G rather than a high-end HD 7970M. I've tried to get better performance, so far to no avail. I thought the problem might be with AMD's Enduro or their drivers in general, but now I'm wondering if the APU is simply getting so hot that it's running at lower CPU speeds.

    I have no idea (well, I *do* have suspicions though) why haxshin is so adamant that Dustin did something wrong with this review, but the fact is the system is underperforming, and it appears to be throttling quite severely. Getting to the CPU to replace the TIM with something better is not something I have ever had to do in the course of a laptop review, and I know this review from Dustin is a couple weeks late. I would assume he at least mentioned some of the concerns to MSI, but if they sent out a lemon laptop to a major review site, what does that say about the potential for retail notebooks? Ugh.
    Reply
  • huaxshin - Wednesday, June 19, 2013 - link

    Are you guys really this uninformed? Not you too Jarred :/

    The reason why you get lower performance with a AMD APU + 7970M (any high end really) is because the CPU part of the APU is bottlenecking the GPU. Its too weak to drive the 7970M. Notebookcheck did an extensive test on the GX60 and found out that the APU cause the overall result over 18 games, to fall down to GTX 660M with i7.
    Its that bad.

    Temperatures is not the culprint there at all. Just weak APU used. The A10-4600M is a 35W TDP, its one of the most cool running CPUs out there. Since it use the exact same chassis as the GT60 with a cooling system built for 45W i7s.
    Running Prime95 caused the A10-4600M to max out at 71C, which in no way will cause throttle.
    http://www.notebookcheck.net/fileadmin/_migrated/p...

    I stand on my opinion that you should contact MSI to make a solution with a replacement than putting out a review that cause both benchmarks and temperature measurements to be wrong. MSI is at fault here for not doing better quality check, no doubt about that. I just hope Dustin thought this through before posting the review.
    Reply
  • DeltaActual - Wednesday, June 19, 2013 - link

    Can admin please ban this lamer? Reply
  • Darkstone - Wednesday, June 19, 2013 - link

    Of course it can throttle at 70°. Notebookcheck recently tested a clevo with haswell that throttles at 70°

    A classmate of mine uses to have an low-end HP with A6 APU. The part throttled as soon as it hit 70°. The throttling temperature is a choice. The thinkpad's throttle at 100°, the XPS 15 (l521x) does not throttle at all (shutdown) with early bios.
    Reply
  • JarredWalton - Monday, June 24, 2013 - link

    Excuse me, huaxshin, aka Cloudfire/Cloudfire777 from our forums, aka Cloudfire over at NotebookReview forums:

    One, we're not looking at the Ivy Bridge i7-3610QM with GTX 680M, are we? Two, we don't fix problems caused by the manufacturer of a notebook (though we do tend to email them and say, "this is underperforming...."). Three, I said "I'm wondering..." not "this is happening"; on further investigations, it appears to be mostly Enduro/APU related. Four, no other review out there is showing results with the GT70 Dragon Haswell+780M edition that are actually significantly different than our numbers; oh, they test different games, and when the CPU isn't taxed as much and therefore doesn't get as hot and therefore doesn't throttle, performance of GTX 780M can be higher than GTX 680M, but that's not what happens in a lot of games.

    Are we done here? You appear to like MSI a lot, having owned one of their laptops and having also commented extensively on forums under the name Cloudfire about MSI hardware. Maybe you own some other notebooks as well, maybe not. The fact is, we report on what we are sent, and if a manufacturer wants to fix a problem they can get in contact with us. When hardware is shipping to end users, though, it's not time to delay for several weeks or more to get an even better cherry picked sample; it's time to post findings. Our findings right now are that MSI's latest GT70 Dragon with GTX 780M and Haswell has some serious problems. Until/unless those get fixed, we cannot recommend this notebook.

    Show me a review that has the same notebook hardware (not a "similar" notebook that has Ivy Bridge or GTX 680M!), and they have some figures that show much better performance and lower temperatures under similar tests to what we have posted, get back to me. Notebookcheck, incidentally, has not actually reviewed this particular laptop. Neither has NotebookReview. Most places that have reviewed it only have one or two gaming tests, often with substantially inferior hardware on a "comparable" system -- like, using GTX 675MX vs. GTX 780M instead of GTX 680M. The fact is that we ran a full suite of tests with the 780M and several other laptops, even going so far as to delay the review a bit to get a full set of up to date GTX 680M numbers. No one else even tried to do that, and at best I've seen reviews with three games and numbers from three or four laptops.
    Reply
  • huaxshin - Wednesday, June 19, 2013 - link

    Sure, compare motherboard with a notebook. That makes sense.

    You have an axe to grind against MSI, so you jump in with this childish comment.
    Reply
  • BobBobson - Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - link

    A good honest review, the first of its kind I have read. This review corresponds to the behavior of my own GT70 notebook.

    Perhaps MSI somehow got a GT70 intended for the masses mixed up with a cherry picked GT70 intended for the Anandtech review.
    Reply
  • landsome - Wednesday, June 19, 2013 - link

    Well, no intention here to fan the fire, but I find it all of this ironic. I own a GT663R and it performs admirably cool with a 920XM (55w) and a replacement videocard of the (now almost) last generation - a 7970M. At stock speeds it's 89C max for the CPU and 83C max for the GPU in prime+furmark - and all that on a Delta 150W psu, on a moderately hot summer day, no throttling, no other cooling except a few holes drilled below the single fan (not my doing). Both CPU and GPU are supposed to be powerhogs and pretty hot too.

    So while it's pretty obvious huaxshin has a big axe to grind (if only in light of his persistence), I would also assume MSI has done an improper paste job on Dustin's sample (not their prerogative exclusively - I once gained an amazing -13C by repasting a Dell M6600). What this says about QC @ MSI is another matter entirely...
    Reply
  • pinkyswear - Wednesday, June 19, 2013 - link

    In the review, you said the system fan pulls air in from the back and exhausts it through the side vent. The fan would actually pull in air from the bottom and exhaust it through the side and the back. If it felt to your hand like air was cool in the back and warm on the side, it means the heatsink for the 780M was working and the 4700MQ was not. When you opened up the machine to take pictures, did you remove any part of the CPU heatsink? The fact that no warm air is blowing out of the back means that something is wrong with the CPU or the heatsink installation. Reply
  • Khenglish - Thursday, June 20, 2013 - link

    Yes there is no way that air is coming in through the CPU radiator. It may seem that way though because since the fan spins clockwise (when looking at the laptop with the bottom plate off), it will build up air speed for the 270 degrees that there is no radiator and blow that out the GPU radiator, while the CPU radiator does not have any air buildup, and thus the air move through it much more slowly and is hard to feel.

    If you guys put you hand to your laptop fans you will notice that far more air blows through one side than the other.

    One fan just does not cut it with these high power components. Then when you add on that MSI uses aluminum radiators, you just have disaster.
    Reply
  • secretmanofagent - Thursday, June 20, 2013 - link

    Just wanted to say, great review, ignore the spam flying around. Reply
  • watzupken - Friday, June 21, 2013 - link

    Having done some homework back then while looking out for a gaming laptop, I do agree that the cooling does look insufficient for a high end gaming laptop. I really doubt the blower fan is pushing out sufficient air through both the heatsinks. Reply
  • michael777 - Monday, June 24, 2013 - link

    I would like to refer in this discussion for a moment to MSI GT70H-80M4811B which was mentioned somewhere above. The cheaper dragons brother was on my shopping list until I read this massive discussion here. To remind it it has the same CPU and GPU with only one SSD and 8GB Ram, rest stays the same. In most of the german webstores the above costs approx 2000 euros and unfortuantely nowhere you can have an alienware with i7 and 780GTX for that price. So there goes my question: if you not willing spending on a gaming laptop more that 2000 does that underperfoming is really such an issue? Isnt it still the best laptop speaking of gaming performance for that money? Am I risking anything more then few frames less in few games compare to actually more expensive competition? Thanks for advice and lots of professional info here. Reply
  • Shayler - Monday, June 24, 2013 - link

    I must say, after comparing this article with Notebookcheck's much more professional and thorough review, I'm disappointed in your outcome.

    With such comments as, "...a few runs of games and some stress testing..." I'm forced to question your methodology which throws your entire review into question.

    Please see Notebookcheck's test of this system (the non dragon edition) and reevaluate your review.

    http://www.notebookcheck.net/Review-MSI-GT70H-80M4...
    Reply
  • JarredWalton - Monday, June 24, 2013 - link

    Given that Notebookcheck's review is of a slightly different build, it may not have the issues we noticed in this review. Our review is what we would expect an end user to get if they buy the GT70 Dragon with i7-4700MQ and GTX 780M right now; if you get a similar system with the MSI chassis but assembled by a boutique that uses different thermal paste, you may see better results. If you're willing to disassemble your notebook to replace the thermal grease, you may also see improved performance and lower temperatures, but we don't expect most end users to resort to such measures. Reply
  • michael777 - Tuesday, June 25, 2013 - link

    Thats great but to come back to my question you cant have a laptop with these specs (considering MSI GT70H-80M4811B) for the price of 2000 euros. So what am I actually risking apart from the hot machine and few frames less in few games? Reply
  • Shayler - Tuesday, June 25, 2013 - link

    Hi Jarred,

    Thanks for taking the time to respond.

    The internals on these systems are identical. The MSI GT60/70 (regardless of model name/number) and all bare bones use the same cooling system. In fact, you can remove the all of these parts and interchange them. Including the motherboards!

    My thought is, you received a bad sample. No one expects the end user to repaste their system (even though it's very easy on these models), but from personal experience with this model, I know for a fact that the temperatures you're reporting are far above normal even with silicon based thermal compounds.

    My concern with your review is the lack of documentation. Where's your methodology? What games did you play, at what settings, and for how long? Wheat benchmarks did you run? What were your ambient temperatures?

    Contact MSI, have them send you a new sample, document your methodology and results, and reevaluate your review.

    If you have the same results, post them and have your, "I told you so." moment.
    Reply
  • JarredWalton - Tuesday, June 25, 2013 - link

    My point about the internals is that special editions (e.g. the Dragon Edition) may go through a modified assembly line at the factory. Dell and others do this as well -- it's an optimization for a SKU that they expect to sell more units, and it simplifies things as they don't have to custom build every single notebook. You just put the same parts in every Dragon and thus it's faster and easier -- but what if you happen to have a minor glitch on the thermal paste application?

    Oh, if only it were that easy. I'll see if Dustin wants to do a follow up...or I can ask as well. Sometimes it's difficult to get even one notebook sample in for review, and if it's not a favorable review they may just try to cut their losses. Anyway, no promises that it will happen, but I'll at least give it a try. Stay tuned....
    Reply
  • michael777 - Tuesday, June 25, 2013 - link

    Looks like its a bit hard for the author(s) of that review to find an answer for my pretty simple question and, in fact, their own statement. So ill try again, what laptop with i7-4700MQ and gtx780 can you find for the similar money even if the cooling isnt the strongest point of this one? Reply
  • JarredWalton - Tuesday, June 25, 2013 - link

    Here are a few vendors stocking Clevo builds (no mSATA RAID, but that's not a huge issue IMO)....

    AVADirect:
    http://www.avadirect.com/gaming-laptop-configurato...
    http://www.avadirect.com/gaming-laptop-configurato...
    http://www.avadirect.com/gaming-laptop-configurato...

    Eurocom (http://www.eurocom.com/) -- look at their gaming notebooks X3/X5/X7.

    OriginPC (tend to be a bit more expensive): http://www.originpc.com/gaming/laptops/

    Mythlogic: http://www.mythlogic.com/mobile.php (Pollux 1613)

    Alienware 17: http://www.dell.com/us/p/alienware-17/fs

    If you're looking at a $2700 notebook like this, there are certainly other options, including beastly SLI setups if you don't mind spending even more money and carrying around a gigantic notebook. They all have pros and cons for certain, but I'd be more inclined to spend a few extra hundred if it's the difference between throttling/cooler temperatures and not. Or maybe it really is just the thermal paste -- we'll see if we can get a second sample for testing.
    Reply
  • Trkkr - Tuesday, August 20, 2013 - link

    I'm looking for the same answers as michael. Jarred, do you know if any of the manufacturers you have listed here have had their 17.3" GTX 780M models reviewed? If they haven't what's to keep their systems from suffering from cooling issues as well (they might have dual fans but that doesn't mean their systems will stay any cooler). Thanks. Reply
  • Globemaster - Thursday, June 27, 2013 - link

    How do you reconcile the folks at gentechpc getting temps of 60 CPU and 65 GPU when running the similar benchmarks on the same Dragon Edition 2 at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jVjv2gcB7uc. I know they have a commercial interest, but doubt they faked the video. I'll be getting mine tomorrow and will try to replicate what you had here. Rest assured, if I get these results, it'll be going back. I just really think you got a lemon. That should be noted, but in my experience with reviews (even of SimCity V), most reviewers try to evaluate a working version of a product while making note of the possible quality control issues rather than just trash the product completely when results come in that seem unreasonable. Possibly at least worth a note in the article that you might have just gotten a lemon, rather than making people search through the comments to find alternate hypotheses. Reply
  • Globemaster - Friday, July 05, 2013 - link

    Just upgraded to 320.49 drivers and got 5002 on Firestrike 3DMark 2013 (same config 4700MQ and 780M) and temps never exceeded 74 on CPU or GPU. Not sure why you got a better score on older drivers with such high temps here (was yours force overclocked???), but I had hoped for over 5000 and hit it. I was getting 4600 with the stock 311.xx drivers. The only scores I'm seeing higher are oc'd through bios or 3rd party programs. My 2 year old Sager with a 485M only got 1563, so this more than triples performance. I'm thriled with this laptop and will be keeping it. Reply
  • ickibar1234 - Saturday, June 29, 2013 - link

    That single fan is enough. Notice that it keeps the CPU in the low 80s at full utilization and the GPU in the 70s Celsius. That is perfectly fine. Yes, you need to press the Cooler boost button to bring the fan to full speed but it is adequate.
    The fan is a different beast compared to normal laptop fans; It is 12 Volts! Yes, 12 Volts.
    brand/model/amperage; NSTECH PABD19735BM -N153 0.65 Amps @ 12V. That is over 6 watts of cooling power in a laptop.

    There have been some reports of bad paste jobs during assembly. Re-paste and temperatures should be very good especially with Cooler Boost on.
    Reply
  • Nocturnal32GB - Tuesday, August 06, 2013 - link

    If you really knew anything about mobile gaming you would never buy a laptop from MSI, Asus or Dell / Alienware in the first place. Those machines are cheap junk to begin with, you can purchase a gaming laptop from M-Tech with better features and way better cooling for less money. Even sager is a better way to go than throwing your money out the window on proprietary garbage like MSI Alienware and the like. Reply
  • MDX - Wednesday, September 04, 2013 - link

    Sager / Clevo laptops are fat, hideous, and bulky. At least Alienware does bulky with style, and they're definitely not low quality (mine's lasted 6 years so far, and I beat the crap out of my laptops). I'm not spending thousands to get something with a hideous clevo case, regardless of the internals. Reply
  • MDX - Wednesday, September 04, 2013 - link

    I trust you guys over Tom's Hardware, but why does they seem to think the cooling system is just fine and not seem to have an issue with heat? Reply
  • MDX - Wednesday, September 04, 2013 - link

    Can't edit comments >< http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/gt70-dragon-ed...

    It almost seems like MSI updated the fan or something?
    Reply

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