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  • Revdarian - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    I am sorry but you really felt comfortable with a "mobile" gaming device that weight over half a kilo for how long?
    How comfortable/uncomfortable was it reported by anyone else who actually tried it for prolonged time?
    Reply
  • Brian Klug - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    Because it spreads a lot of its area out, it really isn't that bad. I definitely spent at least two hours playing nonstop Borderlands 2 without thinking about it. And lots of time outdoors with the AR Drone 2.0.

    -Brian
    Reply
  • zebrax2 - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    For a gaming device review i find it a little disappointing that it seems like not a lot of time was spent playing with the device Reply
  • jasonelmore - Friday, August 02, 2013 - link

    He's been playing With shield for over three months including all of these expos him and anand have went to. I think it's safe to say he's had more playtime than any other reviewer. Reply
  • blanarahul - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    I too want a Nvidia designed phone. Reply
  • chizow - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    Who knows, after Tegra 4i launches, if Shield does well enough, that may be the next step for Nvidia. Reply
  • Samus - Thursday, August 01, 2013 - link

    If anything, this great review proves Shield is a technology showcase for Tegra 4, and how excellent it will be in a phone. Obviously active cooling will be nixed so the clocks will drop, but the battery life is substantial. Reply
  • Spunjji - Thursday, August 01, 2013 - link

    I don't understand the logic here. The clocks will have to drop so performance will as well. Power will drop as well probably - depends on leakage) but then you'll be dealing with a much, much smaller battery. To be honest it's a massive unknown at best. Reply
  • PC Perv - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    You can't be serious. So now weight is relative to shape, in your hands? And talk about the shape.

    Unbelievable how far reviews would go to put gloss on stuff that reviewers themselves will never pay for. The ranting at Google in the last page is pure gold. Talk about "entitlement mentality."
    Reply
  • chizow - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    Why isn't it serious? How weight is balanced and distributed across a surface plays a HUGE impact in how it feels in the hand. This isn't a foreign concept to just mobile devices, look at how knives, daggers, even guns are critiqued in this respect. Reply
  • PC Perv - Thursday, August 01, 2013 - link

    Sure weight balance matters.. for first 10 minutes or so. And no doubt it will be easier to hold something with evenly distributed weight than, say, something to heavy. But that doesn't mean it's absolute weight dissipate in the air because of shape. You will be holding 579g of weight no matter what. If you think 579g is "light," then I have nothing more to say. But the reviewer's bias is palpable.

    I'm looking forward to encountering someone holding this abominable. Hopefully he didn't buy this junk after reading this irresponsible "review." Look how this dude goes length to convince readers how this ugly is somehow "elegant."
    Reply
  • tabascosauz - Thursday, August 01, 2013 - link

    Who are you to hate on Brian?

    Do you seriously think that a portable game console will weigh the same as a 290g Nexus 7? It's a first step for Nvidia and it's performed well, so how did Brian write an "irresponsible review" and "convince readers how this ugly is somehow elegant"? He already said that he spent 2 hours playing BL2 and didn't feel too uncomfortable, what else do you need? Do YOU have a Nvidia Shield?
    Reply
  • Spunjji - Thursday, August 01, 2013 - link

    3DS XL: 336g
    PS Vita (3G): 279g

    Not to defend the original poster too much, but the weight is very high for a product of this sort of category and that is indeed something that can only be properly assessed by a longer period of game-play.
    Reply
  • Death666Angel - Thursday, August 01, 2013 - link

    They are much less powerful, feature fewer and different (in my opinion, a bit inferior) controls, have much less battery life in them and are much less versatile. :) To think the Shield is a hand held console the kind Sony and Nintendo make is very misguided imho. Reply
  • jeffkibuule - Thursday, August 01, 2013 - link

    Neither are designed to be very comfortable to hold for an extended period of time. Neither are ergonomic to your hands. Reply
  • PC Perv - Thursday, August 01, 2013 - link

    Here is the question I pose to you: when do you think this author will realize this thing is heavy and ugly?

    Answer: when the next iteration of the Shield comes out. (If it does come out, lol) when the next version sport slimmer, lighter body then he will gush over how much improvement NV have made. He will THEN tell you how NV's first "attempt" was rather clunky and heavy (per "some" users). Until then he will be "oblivious" to the ugliness and monstrosity of this "Shield," and keep asserting how "elegant" and comfortable it is, blindshading potential buyers.

    Of course he already knows all this. But in this type of "reviews" often there is something else is at work.
    Reply
  • spugm1r3 - Tuesday, August 06, 2013 - link

    Most people don't know how heavy or bulky something is, in particular if it is a joy to use, until the next iteration. I used to own an iBook that weighed just shy of 6lbs. It was hardly top of the line, but I loved it. Now, even Apple's most powerful portable is less than 5lbs.

    Other portable gaming consoles (3DS, Vita) play portable games or, at best, portable versions of console games. This plays PC games, in particular, PC games that are not exactly visual lightweights.

    Honestly, some tech websites I could understand your cynicism, but Anandtech generally does a pretty good job of keeping it honest.
    Reply
  • Subzero0000 - Thursday, August 01, 2013 - link

    579g is definitely "light". There, I said it.

    I've been using iPad2 for almost 2 years, and I tend to feel it too"light" personally.

    As for the Shield, you will hold it with two hands anyway. That weight would means nothing to a full grown man.
    Reply
  • Spunjji - Thursday, August 01, 2013 - link

    http://www.thefreedictionary.com/relative
    3.

    You're entitled to your opinion but that doesn't make it valid for everyone else. ;)
    Reply
  • chizow - Thursday, August 01, 2013 - link

    I'm not going to argue the semantics of what you wrote, you questioned whether weight is relative to shape, in the hands, and yes of course it is. Overall the impact of total weight is relative sure, but you also seem to miss the fact people have different tolerances and preferences. Some contemporary and relevant examples today include the 360 controller vs PS3 controller and the iPhone vs. Samsung Galaxy. You will find people on both sides of the fence who prefer or abhor the different weight characteristics of each, based purely on personal preference.

    As for the commentary on aesthetics, you do realize that is one of the most subjective criteria out there right? That's about as subjective as people's tastes in cars, or even computer chassis. Yet in your criticism of Brian's choice of words, you do realize you come off as every bit the extremist in your own choice of words right?
    Reply
  • This Guy - Thursday, August 01, 2013 - link

    My tablet is 1.3 kg and I have no problem using it like a book. At first I lent it against my leg, desk and bed until I got used to the weight. If 500 grams is to heavy for you try resting your elbows on an arm rest while your playing.

    The device is very elegant. Nvidia is providing gaming with VNC. Try using an openGL game on a wired network with RDC. It sucks and it uses PC hardware. This is an 500 gram handheld android device that lasts for 10 hours.

    Please don't be "That Guy." There are links to Dailytech in the side bar if you must use that tone.
    Reply
  • RYF - Sunday, August 04, 2013 - link

    Ergonomics play a big part is determining if an item can be held for a long time. It is about the weight distributions. E.g. holding a stick of 0.5KG as compared to holding a spherical item of 0.5KG give totally different feeling.

    Your irresponsible choice of words like "junk", "bias", "ugly" simply shows your prejudice.
    Reply
  • Peanutsrevenge - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    You clearly don't handle objects of differing weights, sizes and shapes very often.
    A 30Kg object can feel lighter than a 15Kg object if it's easy to hold, well balanced and controllable shape if the 15Kg one is awkward.

    I remember when Anandtech had almost exclusively readers with an IQ >90.
    Reply
  • jeffkibuule - Thursday, August 01, 2013 - link

    I miss those days. Guess when you become popular, common sense comments go out the window. Reply
  • nathanddrews - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    Haters gonna hate. Never heard of weight distribution? Reply
  • Refuge - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    I don't see how that could have been considered a rant.

    Troll perhaps?
    Reply
  • superflex - Thursday, August 01, 2013 - link

    Maybe you should put down the Xbox controller and pickup a dumbell or barbell once in a while.
    Or would that hurt you quest to become the ultimate dungeon master?
    Reply
  • Sabresiberian - Thursday, August 01, 2013 - link

    What is unbelievable is how clueless and stupid some people can be. You have no idea what Brian and Anandtech are about, you are blatantly rude, and are so ignorant about weight and balance I'm surprised you can actually type. And if Anandtech feels that this response to your post goes overboard I'm sorry, but it is no more offensive than someone calling Brian dishonest in any way, and I don't believe in letting bad behavior go unchecked.

    I used to swing a 1-lb hammer all day long, and there are hundreds of thousands, if not millions over the years, of construction workers who did the same. That's one pound at the end of a stick, swinging it with one hand, not holding it in 2 hands relatively close to your body. Since you are so ignorant let me point out that 1 lb is 454 grams, and that measurement is for the head of the hammer, not the whole hammer. There ar many workers in many fields who deal with a lor more weight than that, 8 or more hours a day, 5 or more days a week.

    Oh, and by the way, a regular wireless Xbox 360 controller weighs 265 grams. So, what you are talking abut here is a little over 1/5 a kilo more weight.

    I'm sorry that the heaviest thing you lift in your life is a Big Mac and you have no muscle tone. I'm sorry that your Mommy was mean to you all your life and so now you have a bad attitude about everything. Here's a clue though - regardless, you are responsible for your behavior in public, responsible for your physical condition, and responsible for your beliefs. Consider this a wake-up call. Get a clue before you post next time.

    Seriously, a good counselor can help a lot, I highly suggest you find one ASAP.
    Reply
  • gi_ty - Friday, August 02, 2013 - link

    Excellent, well said sir! Reply
  • twotwotwo - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    People hold 7-inch tabs that are 400-500g with one hand and a funny grip. So a little over a half-kilo with two hands and real grips seems doable. Reply
  • Wixman666 - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    Half a kilo isn't that heavy, unless you're a kid, even after hours. Reply
  • Revdarian - Wednesday, August 07, 2013 - link

    Being a mobile gaming device, yes i was asking for a kid, but it is honestly too bulky to consider, and for a kid a standard 3ds//vita would be better game library wise.
    But hey, cheers to all the enraged manly men who confused the random troll with my questions and had to share their weight lifting stories, "cool stories bros" /facepalm.
    Reply
  • 420baller - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    "over half a kilo"
    .. you mean a pound?
    Reply
  • boozed - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    No, a pound is under half a kilogram. Reply
  • BryanDobbins - Saturday, August 17, 2013 - link

    my neighbor's mom makes $72/hour on the internet. She has been unemployed for 7 months but last month her pay check was $19114 just working on the internet for a few hours. Read more on this web site... http://goo.gl/qHdAQ4 Reply
  • Rontalk - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    What a crap! Reply
  • silverblue - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    It's actually very impressive. Regardless of whether you've been reading the same review or not, you could at least say more than three words on the subject. Please let us know your thoughts.

    I have to admit that NVIDIA have done rather well here for a first stab, and as software is the main issue, this can be improved upon quite quickly and easily. Who will buy Shield, though?
    Reply
  • Rontalk - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    Just any time a little thin laptop over it, which far more powerful and can be used for everything and do not look like an alien. It seems not even my 6 years old kid excited... Reply
  • connor4312 - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    So I suppose you think that every mobile phone, every mini computer (Rasp Pi, etc), and every tablet, is also crap, because laptops are more powerful? Reply
  • Rontalk - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    Where did I say that? But yeah, even a tablet or a phone are can be used for many things (for games too), they can look very well and to be thin. But this shield, I just do not get it. Maybe for dedo kids, but than should not cost more than $50... At this price level, I'll pay anytime the extra $100 for Ipad 5 tablets... Reply
  • chizow - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    I agree, I think it's an extremely impressive first effort, I just don't know if it will do well enough to warrant future iterations and improvements. Reply
  • danstek - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    This thing has a better WiFi implementation than most laptops and game consoles? What... Reply
  • whyso - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    Actually seems like a win.
    The question is if there is a market for this sort of device.
    Reply
  • Jumangi - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    There's is no question about a market...none exists for this device. Nvidia made this thing to show off the Tegra 4. Reply
  • Dribble - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    Users of the PS Vita, Nintendo DS, etc would disagree with you. There is a market, a pretty big one. Reply
  • darkich - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    ..and this device absolutely blows every one of them away. Reply
  • Spunjji - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    Literally. With its fan.
    -badum tsh-
    Reply
  • Jumangi - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    Lolz, The 3D DS is doing well because its Nintendo with their long history of portables but its on a pace well behind it predecessor. The Vita? Its a dead machine for now. Sales are horrible. This device costs more and has far less software gaming support. So looking at reality no their is no market for a $300 portable gaming machine. Reply
  • Touche - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    You mean, they made it because nobody else wanted Tegra 4. Reply
  • tabascosauz - Thursday, August 01, 2013 - link

    The 4 and 4i Phoenix FFRDs served that purpose, and they did it fairly successfully. So no, the Shield is Nvidia's entry into the DS and Vita world. Reply
  • ervinshiznit - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    Is it possible to run a battery life test with a H.264 encoded video being played back AND streamed over Wifi somehow? I feel like that would be a better simulation of the battery life under PC game streaming without having to sit there and play the game outright until the battery dies (although I'm sure that would be a lot of fun =)) Reply
  • Crono - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    The problem with this kind of gaming device is that it's guaranteed to be selling well only in a niche market.

    It's too big to be portable, not powerful enough to be a console or desktop killer, and not versatile enough or the right form factor to be competitive against tablets. And then there's the obvious fact that mobile gaming is being dominated right now by smartphones and smaller tablets and more traditional handhelds.

    The comparison picture tells a lot: larger than an Xbox 360 controller is too large.
    Reply
  • darkich - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    Desktop killer??
    Did you even read about this device at all??
    This is a desktop EXTENSION in the best way possible
    Reply
  • PNN - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    How is it not versatile enough to compete against 7 inch tablets? If you can spare those 2 inches, you get:
    - It's probably going to have more power than any 7-inch tablet released in the next year.
    - Excelente battery life.
    - Kickstand/gamepad
    - Great speakers (except from the BB Playbook, I haven't seen a 7-inch tablet with decent audio).

    Weight is the only major disadvantage over a 7-inch tablet.
    Reply
  • geniekid - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    Crono's point is that this device is a mobile gaming device. It won't replace a tablet, a smartphone, a laptop, or anything with a virtual/physical keyboard. It's most direct competition is the DS/Vita, which have much higher quality game libraries.

    So who's going to buy this thing? Enthusiast gamers with a need for mobile gaming that aren't satisfied with their DS/Vita. That's a pretty small market these days.
    Reply
  • PNN - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    It obviously won't replace a smartphone or a laptop, not even 9/10/11 inch tablets, but I can imagine people buying one of these instead of an iPod Touch, iPad Mini or a 7 inch Android tablet. It offers similar functionality for a similar price. Again, only if the weight is not too much of an issue. Reply
  • Jumangi - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    It doesn't offer anywhere near the functionality when you take into consideration the form factors with something like the Nexus 7. And saying it will sell over an Ipad mini/ Wow the bizarre reality some people live in to justify weird tech. Reply
  • PNN - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    You're not getting my point. Bye. Reply
  • Spunjji - Thursday, August 01, 2013 - link

    Form factor is a huge consideration too. You will not fit this in a jacket pocket or small bag as easily as any of the devices you mentioned, and you're certainly not going to use it comfortably with one hand. I'm not saying your point is entirely invalid, but you're arguing this thing will fit into niches where it's not an ideal match. Reply
  • darkich - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    "much higher quality game libraries" ..oh man what a load of horse s!it.
    You are obviously completely ignorant about iTunes and Google Play games.
    There's still so much prejudice going on about that among you pc dinosaurs.

    Let me break it down:
    The vast majority of Games on google Play cost up to 7$
    Reply
  • darkich - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    ..
    -there is hundreds of thousands of them.
    - there are many full pc game ports already
    - as far as shooters(genre with the greatest benefit of analog controls) are concerned, the iOS/Gplay library is VASTY superior, with at least ten super cheap titles that are at the same time better than ANY shooter on the DS/Vita.

    Get out of that reality distorted prism and open your eyes already, please.
    Reply
  • nikon133 - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    So... do you get heavy hitters on Shield (and in general for Android/iOS), games like:

    Rayman Origins
    LittleBigPlanet
    Mortal Combat
    Metal Gear Solid HD collection
    Uncharted
    Dead or Alive 5
    Street Fighter X Tekken
    NFS: Most Wanted
    Wipeout 2048
    Ninja Gaiden
    Jak and Daxter Collection

    I have noticed some AAA titles in Android Market Place / Apple AppStore, but many of them seem to be dumbed down versions of console/PC counterparts, sometimes not much more than same name. On Vita, most above mentioned games are very close to originals from big consoles.

    Yes they are much more expensive, but there really is reason for that. I do have Android tablet and iPhone, and had iPad for a while as well... but no, I failed to find many - if any - games of same overall quality you can get on PSP, let alone Vita.
    Reply
  • darkich - Thursday, August 01, 2013 - link

    Unbelievable short sightness..
    The uncharted and (ridiculously overrated) fighter games ate pretty much only titles I give to you, in that list.
    And you missed the Assasin's creed title, while at it.

    iOS/Android?
    The crazy thing is, those libraries are so superior there really cannot be a comparison even.
    There are HUNDREDS OF THOUSANDS OF GAMES ON MOBILE, more titles being released in a day than what comes out in a month on Vita.
    Picking up individual ("casual") titles that have amazed millions of players would take ages, but alright, I'll just try to pick up some of the "highest production quality" ones.
    I dare you to find Vita counterparts to.these:

    - Infinity blade
    - Galaxy on fire
    - Max Payne
    -GTA
    -Deus Ex: The Fall
    - Order and Chaos
    - The Bard's Tale
    - Star Wars: Knights of the Old.Republic
    - Bastion
    - XCOM: Enemy Unknown
    - Six Guns
    - Modern Combat (4)
    - N.O.V.A. (3)
    - Real Racing (3)
    - The Dark Knight Rises
    - Sentinel III
    - Shadowgun: Dead Zone
    - Battle Bears
    - Blitz Brigade
    - Sky Gamblers(personal favorite)
    - NBA 2k 13
    - Chaos Rings
    ..
    And I could go on, and on.
    I hope you realize you've been beaten in your own game now.
    Overall, iOS and Android game libraries are simply beyond comparison superior, offering hundred times more quantity, at a bargain price.
    The reason why it seems the Nintendo and Vita have more quality is because the libraries are tiny and don't get flooded and burried up with thousands upon thousands of casual titles
    Reply
  • darkich - Thursday, August 01, 2013 - link

    ..oh, and last and the most important..the FUTURE TRENDS.
    Android and iOS gaming will only grow-in fact, it is yet to enter the real revolution, with major studios tasting serious profits on the freemium model and taking mobile seriously (EA, for example, will release frostbite games on Android and iOS next year), and mobile GPU's far outperforming the PS3 console in a less than a year.

    Otoh, Vita and Nintendo DS will simply fade into complete irrelevance.
    Reply
  • nikon133 - Thursday, August 01, 2013 - link

    Uncharted and fighting games only..?

    I will respectfully disagree. MGS Collection, Ninja Gaiden, Jak and Daxter are all premium titles. As well as LittleBigPlanet, one of most original franchises in recent years.

    I didn't compile list of best games, I just listed bunch of games I recall that were well reviewed. Beside Assassin Creed, I also missed

    Sly Cooper: Thieves in Time
    MLB 13: The Show
    Disney Epic Mickey 2: The Power of Two
    Muramasa Rebirth
    Velocity Ultra
    Dragon's Crown
    Guacamelee!
    Soul Sacrifice
    PlayStation All-Stars Battle Royale
    Persona 4 Golden
    Zero Escape: Virtue's Last Reward
    Doruko
    FIFA 13
    FIFA 14
    Final Fantasy X
    Gravity Rush
    Madden NFL 13
    ...

    ... and I could go on and on.

    True, Vita and GB are missing variety of cheap casual titles, so if one's preference in gaming is tossing birds and piggies across the screen, then it is simple choice.

    But for premium, PC/console-quality titles? No. Not yet, at least. Those are still too few for Android/iOS. And of those that do exist, many are riddled with poor control schemes or poor execution in general.
    Reply
  • darkich - Friday, August 02, 2013 - link

    Which games from my list have you played, and on what device? Reply
  • 5150Joker - Tuesday, August 06, 2013 - link

    NVIDIA: Thanks for the review! The check is in the mail! :D

    Seriously, who in their right mind would buy this oversized piece of junk?
    Reply
  • Jumangi - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    Yea and the vast majority of them are that cheap for a reason. Reply
  • Jumangi - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    Those 2 inches matter allot to people. The form factor matters allot to people(bulky controller with flip screen and a fan going vs a sleek tablet like the new Nexus 7) The Nexus gets great battery life too. The power means nothing if it can't be used and I doubt much their will ever be and real support for the thing.

    Its has no future.
    Reply
  • Someguyperson - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    I'm really torn whether to get this, or the new Nexus 7. I feel that half my time using a portable device is reading online articles and the other half playing emulators, but I might be leaning towards this guy. $300 isn't cheap enough for an impulse buy though. Reply
  • blanarahul - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    Get the new Nexus 7. It has a larger screen so on screen controls won't be too bad. OpenGL ES 3.0 support is a big plus too. Reply
  • kmmatney - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    On screen controls suck even on the much larger iPad. Emulators support RF controllers like the Wii Controller, but not enough official games do. Reply
  • varad - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    Gamestop will probably have both devices on display. So you should be able to play with both and decide which one you like better! Reply
  • psuedonymous - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    Much as I love the idea of the local streaming feature, you might be better served at this point with a Nexus 7, a DualShock 3 and a Gameklip. Reply
  • JeffFlanagan - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    Thanks for mentioning the Gameklip. I hadn't heard of it, and just ordered one with cases for my Nexus 7 and Galaxy Note, in case the Nexus 7 is too top heavy to game comfortably. Reply
  • Subzero0000 - Thursday, August 01, 2013 - link

    You should get Nexus 7. 'cus you can read online comfortably, and play some games occasionally. Buy a Android compatible controller if you must.

    Reading on the Shield is not going to be nice with the controller attached (unremovable) to it.
    Reply
  • boozed - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    Probably should rephrase the beginning of that second para to "It’s no secret that Tegra isn’t exactly the success that NVIDIA probably hoped it would be." Reply
  • Krysto - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    Brian. The delay of Tegra 4 most likely not the main reason why Google didn't go with them this time. There are other more important reasons, such as"

    1) no LTE for Tegra 4, and Google wanted LTE for Nexus 7, one that works on all carriers

    2) no OpenGL ES 3.0 support - was one of the main features of Android 4.3

    3) S4 Pro is probably close to half the price of Tegra 4. If they wanted a more expensive chip, they could've gone with S600 at the very least

    4) Power consumption might've played a role there, too. We need to see how Tegra 4 does in a tablet, although I honestly can't consider a chip a "mobile chip" if it can't be put in a smartphone because of too high power consumption.
    Reply
  • SydneyBlue120d - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    Well, let's take a look at the comments about Toshiba Excite Pro, the first sipping Tablet with Tegra 4 onboard, Toshiba Excite Pro http://amzn.com/B00D78Q2NQ :

    - I would have most definitely kept the tablet, had it not overheated. I realize that some overheating will hsppen under normal use. However, I was quite concerned when the unit overheated a lot after only 20 or 30 minutes of use.

    - Runs extremely hot. After 10-15 mins playing light games or watching Netflix, its crazy hot

    - It's overheat when play any game for 10mins

    Ok, we don't know if it is Toshiba fault, however the fact that event on the shield it is running a fan, should sound quite dangerous...
    Reply
  • Spunjji - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    My thoughts exactly. I can't for a second believe that the chip can hold up its performance levels in a thermally constrained without something giving; something either being the ability to run cool or the performance itself. Reply
  • pancakes - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    I heard they used Mini-HDMI because it's the most secure when moving the device around (via http://www.androidpolice.com/2013/07/30/nvidia-shi... Reply
  • VulgarDisplay - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    I incredulously read the praise being heaped upon this device wondering what type of NDA had been agreed to for such an upbeat review of this odd and all but useless device and then I got to the end.

    I love the passive aggressive way of confirming what everyone already knows about the Shield, there is absolutely no reason to buy this over a smartphone. Don't worry guys, it offers minimal hitching and low latency when played on the toilet a room away from where your PC with no latency and a usable screen is sitting using up energy to stream games to a device that also uses energy. Oh, and don't forget that this brick with a fan is faster than a 10mm thick tablet that has a more usable screen that when paired with a ps3 controller would actually make a more portable gaming package.

    So many of the uninformed are going to be extremely disappointed that the only way that the PC streaming will actually provide a good experience is by using it in the same house as the PC you are streaming from.
    Reply
  • Cohaagen - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    There is absolutely no reason to buy this over a smartphone?

    If you want a smartphone, this is the wrong device. But I'm searching for a fast device, which can handle all Android games now and the next few years and has a good battery life.

    Even the actual Android-flagships Galaxy S4, HTC One and Xperia Z (both much more expensive than the Nvidia Shield) are slower than the Shield.... the PS3 controller not even counted in. Their battery life is worse.

    Due to their 1080p-displays, their performance limit will be reached much sooner by more demanding games... the same goes for the new Nexus 7. I really like the decision of Nvidia, not to follow the ppi craze, 720p is perfectly fine for a gaming device with 5"-display.
    Reply
  • Cohaagen - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    Correction:
    Even the actual Android-flagships Galaxy S4, HTC One and Xperia Z (all of them much more expensive than the Nvidia Shield, the PS3 controller not even counted in) are slower than the Shield. Their battery life is worse.
    Reply
  • chizow - Sunday, August 04, 2013 - link

    Yes looking at some benchmarks around the Net, I didn't realize how fast this thing is. It's also significantly faster than the leaked Snapdragon S800 version of the Galaxy S4. Too bad Nvidia couldn't get Tegra 4's thermals under control, it's quite the performer. Reply
  • GrahamAudio - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    Is there a camera? Reply
  • blanarahul - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    The last line of the article pretty much sums up everything. I wish they would do something like Project Phoenix. Reply
  • ET - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    Thanks for the review. The Shield looks like it right for my needs, and I'm glad it turned out to be well implemented. I might buy it at some point (if I have someone to bring it from the US), and finally get to play some of the PC games I don't get to play because my gaming time is usually away from my PC. Then again by that time I might be playing games such as Shadowrun Returns, Broken Age and Deus Ex: The Fall on my Nexus 7 and won't feel the need to buy it. And maybe, just maybe, Kainy will work well enough one day to provide decent PC streaming. Still, it's a tempting device for me. Reply
  • Heavensrevenge - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    I REALLY hope they just say screw developing this too much to waste resources on it beyond now to beat this dead horse, I agree 100% Nvidia should mold this beast device into a super smartphone factor and rip Google Nexus' a new one.
    It's a cool device, but it's ~90% useless to ~90% of people (me included) .
    So if they make a super kick-ass extreme battery life super-phone, I'd definitely buy one of those!
    But Shield will never be in my wish-list of things to get ok Nvidia? If your reading this... Give us the best phones in a year or so and be done with this down-scaling prototype and get past this foreplay to the action of a beast phone which this thing dreams to grow up into.
    Reply
  • JNo - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    Sot it's of potential use to 10% of the population? That's still a huge market!

    What's with all the hate. Not every device has to have universal appeal. Those who see the value in it know who they are.
    Reply
  • DesktopMan - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    Do you really need 1080p in a gaming device at this size? I'd prefer not to gimp performance. I agree that it should have been larger though, since there is space for it. Reply
  • Cohaagen - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    I agree. I'm even happy with the 960x544 resolution of the PS Vita, so I have no problem with the 1280x720 resolution for the same screen size. Reply
  • JNo - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    I agree. I'm amazed Brian is still gunning for 1080p. I can't imagine it would stream well at all wirelessly, especially games where laglass performance is a deal breaker. Most people can't get 1080p movies to stream over wireless N without significant issues.

    And it would shove the cost up significantly on what is already a non-impulse purchase.

    Sorry Brian, obviously 1080 would be beautiful but it has to work and make economic sense. I'm really surprised you don't/didn't see this. Not trying to sound rude because I really love your writing.
    Reply
  • nathanddrews - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    Getting 1080p 1:1 Blu-ray (48Mbps) to stream over N is difficult without excellent conditions, but something compressed down to a Netflix-sh 8-10Mbit stream with 5.1 audio is more than realistic, even over G. Double the rate to reduce artifacts and you're golden. Reply
  • Sertis - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    Most PC games don't scale up their fonts and fine details for higher PPI screens. If you can't see the pixels at a comfortable playing distance, you probably can't read the 12 point text. 1080p on a 7" screen might work, but that's pushing it. Reply
  • damianrobertjones - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    "5-inch 1280x720 "Retinal" Display"

    Retinal display? Is that a 'Retina display' but not quite?
    Reply
  • A5 - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    "Retina Display" is an Apple trademark, iirc. Reply
  • jjj - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    Interesting review , i don't think it will sell ,the hardware seems nice but the concept is problematic.
    Maybe for this one you should have included some loading time tests, the NAND perf doesn't seem all that good and made me wonder how much it impacts loading times.
    Hope you guys will have a T4 tablet review soon, the Toshibas and the HP are in retail.
    Reply
  • R3MF - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    "I said in the Nexus 7 review that I wished whatever happened to Tegra 4 that delayed it hadn't, so we could see it in more devices."

    I glad Tegra couldn't be included in the Nexus7 update, that would have meant no OpenGL ES 3.0 and no OpenCL.
    Reply
  • Arbee - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    This thing, far more than the CPU-gimped Ouya, is the ultimate emulation machine. It's one of the first ARM devices with enough CPU grunt to do some really impressive things in that space, and Nvidia isn't blind to that market; they've been seeding beta units to emulation programmers. There's a new version of MAME4Droid with explicit support for it out already, for instance. Reply
  • ChronoReverse - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    I won't comment on the Ouya but it's not really true that the Shield has the CPU power to go beyond existing Android platforms.

    The Shield still doesn't have sufficient power to emulate the PS2 so it's limited to PSP, DS and N64 class emulation.

    But the Snapdragon Pro already has sufficient power to emulate those at full speed (in fact, it's insufficient software optimization that holds back emulation performance). Actually even quad A9's can do it.

    So the Shield is stuck at a halfway point where it doesn't offer greater emulation capabilities despite being more powerful.
    Reply
  • fr33h33l - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    Your comment seems contradictory to the CPU Performance section in the review, e.g. than not even Snapdragon 800 (itself significantly faster than Snapdragon Pro) can keep up with Tegra 4 in terms of CPU performance. Care to elaborate on your claims? Reply
  • Arbee - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    Yes and no - it can do the existing platforms at a much higher degree of fidelity than the existing emulators, and it can run (ARM ports of) the best-of-breed PC emulators for those systems like bsnes and so on. It can run real current MAME instead of the gimpy circa-1999 "4All" version, it can run bsnes/higan instead of snes9x, and NEStopia instead of I don't know what. That in itself is a great upgrade for accuracy snobs like me, and then combine it with decent controls and it's great.

    I agree that a similar device with a Snapdragon Pro or Apple A6 wouldn't give away much in the performance department, but nobody's making one. Meanwhile, FedEx just showed up with my Shield :)
    Reply
  • mamisano - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    Sorry if I missed it, what are the minimum hardware requirements for the gaming PC to stream to Shield? You used a pretty beefy system that is definitely not representative of the average rig out there. Reply
  • PNN - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    Nvidia GTX 600 series or newer is required. Reply
  • ssiu - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    Pretty beefy hardware required. From http://shield.nvidia.com/play-pc-games

    > GPU: GeForce GTX 650 or higher desktop GPU (Notebook GPUs are not supported at this time)
    > CPU: Intel Core i3-2100 3.1GHz or AMD Athlon II X4 630 2.8GHz or higher
    > System Memory: 4GB or higher
    > Software: GeForce Experience™ application and latest GeForce drivers
    > OS: Windows 8 or Windows 7
    > Routers: 802.11a/g router (minimum). 802.11n dual band router (recommended).
    Reply
  • Roland00Address - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    Apple has trademark the term Retina Display. Thus nvidia can not use it Reply
  • spigzone - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    Likely developed as in in house remote terminal for the Steam Box, where it would actually make sense, it's release into the wild indicates Nvidia ultimately lost to AMD to provide that hardware, likely due to publisher/developer pressure to go with a console compatible solution an AMD HSA APU that they could port to easily and cheaply. Reply
  • chizow - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    Looks like an impressive first effort by Nvidia, especially since it's almost 100% home-grown. Not interested in it for my own user however, not yet anyways, for the reasons below:

    1) Android gaming market just isn't enough on it's own to justify this for me. Phone and tablet are enough atm for minor gaming on my mobile devices.
    2) I did not see any mention of this being used as a Windows Media Extender. If this were able to function as a streaming device, even for DLNA compatible devices, that would be a huge plus for SHIELD. It already has the mini-HDMI output and wireless capabilities, would just need the software.
    3) PC streaming to local network connection is nice, but if this could be expanded to remote locations with sufficient network connectivity, I'd be sold instantly.

    Overall I think Nvidia is building an impressive track record with their in-house hardware designs, I'm really hoping Shield does well enough that it warrants a 2nd iteration and improvements, but right now, I'm really not sure what it's future holds for many of the reasons cited in the article.
    Reply
  • Arbee - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    There are DLNA applications for Android in the Play Store. I don't know how well they function, but perhaps one or more of them might work for you. Alternatively, if you run the Plex media server, their Android app *is* good. Reply
  • chizow - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    Thanks, I'll have to keep an eye out for some info from users/reviews about streaming functionality. I was specifically interested in Windows Media Extender functionality to playback encrypted/premium cable TV from a cable card tuner, and it looks like XBMC may do the trick. Just not sure if the Android version supports this, or if the Android version of XBMC runs on Shield (it should since it's full Android 4.2.1).

    This video indicates it may be possible to stream cable card content to XBMC, but it looks like Windows version: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0aFTl3wYf04
    Reply
  • SlitheryDee - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    I'm pretty intrigued by this product. With the delay of tegra 4 and the presence of cheaper dedicated gaming systems with far more titles available to them, I have to think that this iteration was focused on ironing out the bugs in the design rather than setting the world on fire with sales. Just getting it out there, making people aware of it, and starting up the development of a decent number of games with the shield in mind would have to be enough to call the first run a success IMO. I don't know how Nvidia could have expected any more than that when thrusting a gamepad oriented android device into a touch-centric game world. I like that it was well executed, and I hope they go ahead with the next version with a (hopefully on time) tegra 5. Reply
  • et20 - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    Thanks for the review.
    It's a really nice surprise to see nvidia deliver such a well balanced and put together product.
    Let's hope that it will spur availability of high quality games.
    Reply
  • Hrel - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    Frankly this is a nice little device that does a lot of things right. Perhaps I'll pick one up when they do a revision featuring Nvidia's newest mobile GPU. That is of course the downside to devices this integrated (mobile); no upgrade ability. Upgrade ability is really the primary thing that I think is stopping gaming from moving to mobile devices for real. Once the product cycles slow down, which they're already doing, we should see mobile gaming really start to catch on and devices like this actually start to sell well.

    For now, no 802.11ac = not even the POSSIBILITY of me purchasing.
    Reply
  • dbx81 - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    shield + chromecast seems like a good combo right away, doesn't it? Reply
  • rwei - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    I'd rather have a Switchblade Reply
  • Suvorov Sulla - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    I know Brian can't do it because he is writting an official review and all that jazz but I REALLY wanted to see someone using a SNES and a PSP emulator on this thing. I would be honestly interested if it works well. Reply
  • thesavvymage - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    I cant speak for PSP as I've never tried it, but snes emulation with a ps3 controller works flawlessly on my Nexus 4. This thing is more powerful in every way, so it should be pretty amazing. Reply
  • nafhan - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    So... I'd be really interested in seeing a "battery life while streaming a PC game" test. I'm guessing something like the web browsing battery life -30%.

    Actually, a streaming video playback test might be interesting to see in general.
    Reply
  • cmikeh2 - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    I think it will be well above that. With the web browsing test there's a lot of CPU activity but when doing the remote PC gaming all it is doing is play an H.264 video from the network. I see it as pretty much in the middle of the web browsing test and the H.264 test. Reply
  • fr33h33l - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    Nice review as always and good to see Shield and Tegra 4 finally shipping.

    I am curious though as to what has led to the (so far) low adoption rate of Tegra 4, especially in contrast to the almost performance-wise equivalent Snapdragon 800. Was it just a matter of time-to-market, or was it deal negotiation issues, or as some say (without providing conclusive evidence) that Tegra 4 is inferior to Snapdragon 800 in power efficiency?

    Does anyone have more insights (as opposed to unsubstantiated rumors) into this?
    Reply
  • Spunjji - Thursday, August 01, 2013 - link

    Previously mentioned Amazon reviews for the Toshiba Excite Pro indicate overheating issues and poor battery life. That's not as good as a proper analysis but I'd hesitate to call it unsubstantiated. Reply
  • fteoath64 - Saturday, August 03, 2013 - link

    A lot of people are curious about this same question :"Is Tegra 4 is inferior to Snapdragon 800 in power efficiency?". I would agree that it is a yes but not by much. The issue for both chips are that they are overkill (in battery sapping rate) for phone implementation and more suitable for large tablet and console use such as Shield. I think the issue of T4 is its TTM just kills the market opportunity and also the fact that Qualcomm has had multiple solutions to match/counter the old T3 design wins and hence snags them all!. It is a pity for Nvidia but the market is rather brutal due to fierce competition. Even Intel cannot muscle themselves in with the new Atom chip. Not that it is good enough or low priced (huh!). This T4 device at least gives the market some sort of benchmark in comparing its performance in detail over the coming weeks. The S800 tablets are not as forthcoming as we hoped so there is plenty of time to determine some much wanted data.
    It is interesting to see the SnapDragon S4 Pro chip being used in Nexus 7 and Moto X, new Droid range as well especially when the flagship S600 was doing so well. Is there a radical price difference , I wonder ...
    Reply
  • WeaselITB - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    Didn't see it in the review, but I'm curious how well it performs streaming PC game to Shield to HDMI cable plugged into a TV. Cabling get in the way? Problems with battery life in this scenario? How well does the high-res PC compress down to stream to the Shield, then upconvert back to 1080p for the TV? What about transition from sitting on the couch with the cable plugged into the TV, then unplugging the cable to walk into the kitchen, any glitches with transitioning back to the in-device screen? Reply
  • marraco - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    I wish I had a PC client for streaming, so I can run my GTX 670 and play on my laptop/netbook Reply
  • marraco - Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - link

    That would rule out AMD cards for me Reply
  • pandemonium - Thursday, August 01, 2013 - link

    I just don't see the point in spending money on a mobile gaming device any more. With all of the smartphones and tablets out there, this is going to be a difficult sell to anyone but the most enthusiastic of fans.

    Also, my PC is built for gaming and the ecosystem isn't really going anywhere (contrary to popular belief that it's been dying for years and years...). Plus, there's consoles.

    It may be awesome, but not for the current day and age. If this came out in 2006, it would've made a killing.
    Reply
  • darkhawk1980 - Thursday, August 01, 2013 - link

    The only comment I have is that when I played around with this at PAX East 2013, the screen mechanism felt VERY flimsy. I'm not sure if it was because of the fact that these were demo units that were (obviously) very used at that point or what, but I felt like if I closed the screen the hinge would make the screen break in half. It just didn't provide a good feel as it closed, like the hinge was too tight. It reminded me of my MSI GT70's screen at times, where I'm very careful closing it since it is rather delicate.

    All that aside, it did seem like a good device and was fun to use, but I just don't feel I'd use it as much simply because I enjoy having a tablet for real use.
    Reply
  • bertiebond - Thursday, August 01, 2013 - link

    so.. its got a screen, it has speakers, it has a a mic, it has wifi..
    so it just needs 3g and you can stick it next to your ear and start making calls ?D
    Reply
  • Spunjji - Thursday, August 01, 2013 - link

    SIDETALKIN' Reply
  • Dug - Friday, August 02, 2013 - link

    Thanks for the review. I think the ability to stream computer games to this is a huge draw for me.
    Most of the time I need to be in the "family room" and I can't bring all of my computer gear out there. That way I can still casually play games and interact with the rest of the family. I really dislike a big gaming laptop.

    I hope you can follow up with more games being played from the PC.
    I also run MAME on my main computer. I wonder if you could stream that to the sheild.

    The other option I'm looking at is the PS4 as they say you can stream games from that to the VITA.
    Reply
  • fivefeet8 - Thursday, August 08, 2013 - link

    You can run MAME natively on the Shield using Retroarch. It's on the play store. Also, Nintendo DS emulation runs fantastic on the device with Drastic(also on the playstore). ;) Reply
  • ToothSlayer - Saturday, August 03, 2013 - link

    Looks like it would be good for GBA/NDS Emulation. Reply
  • dabotsonline - Monday, August 05, 2013 - link

    "Here we see Tegra 4 in Shield outperforming all of the shipping players on Android, and virtually tying with Adreno 330 in Qualcomm's upcoming MSM8974 (Snapdragon 800 platform)."

    Isn't the MSM8974 Snapdragon 800 already shipping in the Galaxy S4 LTE-A SHV-E330S for SK Telecom in South Korea?
    Reply

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