Powerline Networking Products:

First off, the updates on the powerline front. In addition to the single port Atheros 7400 based XAVB5001 500 Mbps powerline kit (which is already selling in Europe, but is yet to reach North American shores), we are also getting a four port version (the XAVB5004). The four port version is slated to cost just $10 more than the single port version at $169.99. With no other powerline silicon vendor having production ready 500 Mbps silicon, the AR7400 continues to get used here.

XAV5004: 4-port Powerline AV 500 Adapter

Wireless Networking Products:

Netgear is also making a serious push towards satisfying the needs of service providers such as Comcast and AT&T by providing a unified cable / DSL modem / router / powerline combination products in the CG3202 and DGND3700. While the latter (DSL modem + router) is a definite retail product, it is not clear whether the cable modem + router combo will make it to the retail channel.

The WNHDB3004 3DHD networking product is a groundbreaking product, but many people do not realize the presence of an interesting technology (4x4 MIMO over Wi-Fi) behind it. When taking plain throughput into consideration, or even over small distances (like, in a single bedroom apartment), the unit probably doesn't have the 'wow' factor going for it (it just performs as good as ordinary 802.11n Wi-fi). The strengths really start to show when going over 300ft or more. Here, the QoS provided by the unit has to be seen to be believed. The product is powered by silicon from Quantenna Communications (we talked to them briefly at CES Unveiled) and we were promised even more powerful silicon with sustained rates of upto 600 Mbps soon. The unfortunate aspect of this product is that it is usable for only video presently (UDP transmission).
 
The show stealer for Netgear was obviously the WNDR3800 model with dual band GbE using a 680 MHz MIPS processor at its heart. There are a host of features such as the Netgear Genie, Clear Channel Selector and ReadyShare over-the-internet access already explained in great detail on multiple other sites. The intersting scoop we have that is not available anywhere else is the fact that the Zixi Video Operating System is available only on this router at the transmitting end. More details about Zixi will be covered in the NTV 550 section.

WNDR3800: N600 Wireless Dual Band Gigabit Router—Premium Edition

Netgear also introduced a 3G / 4G modem / router combo with support for HSPA+ / LTE. The internal modem modules are from Sierra Wireless. There is no out-of-the-box support for WiMax, but that can be easily solved with the help of many available USB dongles.

Netgear Network Storage & Media Streamer Products
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  • jasperjones - Friday, January 07, 2011 - link

    "The strengths really start to show when going over 300ft or more. Here, the QoS provided by the unit has to be seen to be believed."

    What has distance to do with QoS?

    "The show stealer for Netgear was obviously the WNDR3800 model with dual band GbE using a 680 MHz MIPS processor at its heart."

    The formulation "dual GbE" seems strange.The WNDR3800 features a single GbE WAN port and four Gbe LAN ports. It also functions as a simultaneous dual band wireless router.
    Reply
  • DanNeely - Friday, January 07, 2011 - link

    At longer distances signals are weaker and more error prone. QoS is much more important in that environment than within the same room where the SNR is an order of magnitude better. Reply
  • vol7ron - Friday, January 07, 2011 - link

    "What has distance to do with QoS?"
    - There are propagation problems that occur with any signal. Distance and other factors heighten these problems, which decrease the QoS (quality of service).

    - My issue is that I'm in a 1 bedroom apt where everyone seems to be using wireless - this also causes signal interruptions and I'm thinking of getting a Wireless-A router to see if it helps. I have a DLink DIR-655 802.11N that worked pretty good at first, but has since started having problems (part of which may be due to an old cable modem).

    "The formulation "dual GbE" seems strange.The WNDR3800 features a single GbE WAN port and four Gbe LAN ports. It also functions as a simultaneous dual band wireless router. "

    - I originally didn't understand what you were saying, now I see. Yes, his wording was a little confusing. It's dual-band wireless and has gigabit ethernet.
    Reply
  • Jedi2155 - Saturday, January 08, 2011 - link

    /begin rant
    Currently I own a WNDR3700 router (with probably the same 680 MHz CPU) and although highly impressed by the pure wireless performance, the QoS as typically understood in managing latency was horrific when trying to deal VOIP/gaming with other users were streaming video/downloading/p2p.

    For example my Ventrilo latency was 15 ms with old D-Link gaming router (DGL-4300), but jumped to 30 ms idle. With P2P/streaming video on another user's computer and QoS turned on to prioritize traffic to my specific Ethernet port on the router, the ping still jumped to 80 ms. Occasionally it would even spike to 300-3000 ms! This was with QoS enabled and all the settings configured the best I could (being a former Tier 3 network technician at my University campus for I'd say I gave it a good shot....). I would say Netgear's QoS implementation is more less useless in its current form for its old routers.

    Switching to DD-WRT significantly improved my QoS to useable ranges (dropped my Ventrilo ping back to normal 15 ms without no load....and 30-50 with P2P/video streaming). However the wireless performance is now crap meaning there was no point to even switch from my old D-Link router.

    Oy.....

    /end rant
    Reply
  • Spivonious - Friday, January 07, 2011 - link

    It's nice to see Netgear looking to improve relations with consumers by using the AVS Forum. There is a thriving HTPC population on there that I'm sure will have great ideas for the Netgear devs. Reply

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