21:9 monitors have done a good job of filling a couple niche positions in the marketplace. For someone that wants a single display to watch movies and use with the PC, the aspect ratio can work well. With many games, the wider field-of-view enhances games with more information on screen at once and a more immersive experience. Where they have fallen short is with their vertical resolution of 1080 pixels. Running two applications side-by-side makes everything feel cramped. For regular office work a 27” display for the same price has provided a better user experience.

Now we have the first 21:9 aspect ratio monitor with 1440 pixels of vertical resolution, the LG 34UM95. That provides the same vertical area as a 27” display but 3440 horizontal pixels instead of 2560. The larger size makes running two programs side-by-side equivalent to dual 20” displays at 1720x1440, or a 6:5 aspect ratio. Furthermore, the additional real estate makes it much easier to use for non-gaming or movie use. From spreadsheets to word processing, image editors to web browsers, the additional vertical space makes a large difference.

The LG 34UM95 is also the first non-Apple display to include Thunderbolt support. With three integrated USB ports you can use a single cable to drive the 34UM95 display and connected devices from a Thunderbolt equipped computer. An additional Thunderbolt connection allows you to connect another device directly to the 34UM95 as well. Unlike the Apple display there isn’t an Ethernet port, but there is integrated audio.

For traditional video cards the display includes a DisplayPort input and two HDMI ports. The HDMI ports are still revision 1.4a so they cannot support 60Hz refresh rates at the monitor's native resolution, but DisplayPort will run at 3440x1440 at 60Hz without any issues, including audio support. The monitor includes a full color management system with a 1-point white balance. As with previous LG displays, I have found that the CMS doesn’t work well and should be avoided. It improves the 100% readings but makes everything below that worse.

The 34UM95 includes two “Reader Modes” designed to make reading documents on-screen easier. In use what they do is pump up the red in the white balance. Since most displays ship with an overly-blue image by default, and people are used to that, this will help those people. If you have the display calibrated correctly, you wind up with an image that is very red and large errors in gamma and grayscale. Since these are easy to enable and disable in the menu system, if you like them it is easy to utilize it.

LG 34UM95
Video Inputs 2x HDMI 1.4a, DisplayPort
Panel Type IPS
Pixel Pitch 0.2325mm
Colors 1.07 Billion
Brightness 320 cd/m2
Contrast Ratio 1000:1
Response Time 5ms GtG
Viewable Size 34"
Resolution 3440x1440
Viewing Angle (H/V) 178 / 178
Backlight LED
Power Consumption (operation) 56W
Power Consumption (standby) 1.2W
Screen Treatment Anti-Glare
Height-Adjustable No
Tilt Yes, -5 to 15 degrees
Pivot No
Swivel No
VESA Wall Mounting Yes, 100mm VESA
Dimensions w/ Base (WxHxD) 32.7" x 18.5" x 6.8"
Weight 17 lbs.
Additional Features 3.5mm stereo out, 2x Thunderbolt, 2x USB 2.0, 1x USB 3.0, 2x7W speakers
Limited Warranty 1 year
Accessories DisplayPort Cable, HDMI Cable
Price $999

 

Additional Features and Usability
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  • blackmagnum - Wednesday, June 18, 2014 - link

    The Koreans are on a roll with product diversity! Reply
  • SulianJeo - Wednesday, June 18, 2014 - link

    I've always felt that the Korean companies seem to push for innovation the most. There are certainly some redundant releases (GS 5), but so many products are really game changing. Reply
  • weiran - Wednesday, June 18, 2014 - link

    This is a nice idea using existing hardware and manufacturing with a very niche market.

    I fail to see where the innovation is.
    Reply
  • darwinosx - Wednesday, June 18, 2014 - link

    You should read the article you are commenting on then. Also it's hardly a niche market. That is an uninformed and laughable comment. Reply
  • chophshiy - Wednesday, June 18, 2014 - link

    "Innovation" is becoming a meaningless word, thanks to marketing-speak. I agree with weiran; Making an obvious evolutionary step with tech that is easily available and understood should not be referred to as 'innovation'. Reply
  • inighthawki - Wednesday, June 18, 2014 - link

    Sorry, these displays are definitely niche. Very few people see benefit of ultra widescreen displays. There are more people out there that want to go back to 4:3 than those who want to go to 21:9. Reply
  • FlyBri - Wednesday, June 18, 2014 - link

    @inighthawki I would have to disagree that this monitor is "niche". Based on the form factor and resolution, it's actually quite versatile, and a better option than a 4K monitor at the moment (due to the current state of graphics cards). Many reviewers are saying how versatile this monitor is for both productivity and gaming. For instance, you can even use this monitor as a regular 1440p 27" monitor (with black bars, of course) if you so choose. One review I watched had the reviewer stating that he already had negative preconceived notions about this monitor and form factor, and ended up realizing how absolutely amazing it is and how he couldn't be without it now.

    I don't think it's niche because I think it genuinely could be a better alternative to a dual monitor setup, and I don't believe those to be niche. Not as prevalent? Yes. Niche? No. I would would say 4K monitors are more niche than this monitor.
    Reply
  • fokka - Wednesday, June 18, 2014 - link

    what you say makes sense, but i'd still call a 21:9 monitor with a unique resolution "niche". 4k is the future and will be the mainstream in a couple years. this? not so much. Reply
  • Marthisdil - Wednesday, June 18, 2014 - link

    It's niche because it's $1000 Reply
  • Samus - Wednesday, June 18, 2014 - link

    So is every other corporate grade monitor. My 24" Dreamcolor Display cost $2000 a few years ago. Reply

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