Introducing the Antec GX700

Most manufacturers are quicker and happier to show us their medium-to-high end cases, but for a lot of users the case is admittedly a steel box they put their computer into. While I personally advocate spending up a bit and getting a quality case, the enthusiast looking to maximize the distance their dollar can go may not be willing to shell out for something big and fancy. For those users, there are cases like the Antec GX700.

When I saw it on display at CES, I was surprised at the incredibly low $59.99 price tag. Now that I've had it in house for testing and review, I see more of how they got there. This isn't necessarily a good or bad thing, but simply a fact of life when you're buying budget. Still, a case at this price point featuring a pair of 140mm fans, a single 120mm fan, a fan controller, and support for increasingly common 240mm radiators? There has to be a catch, right? As it turns out there are a couple of small ones, but not the ones you'd think.

That's what a review and in depth analysis is for, but the Antec GX700 is interesting if for no other reason than to just see the approach Antec took towards serving this market segment. The GX700 was one of the cases that impressed me at CES this year because of the integrated fan controller, and that's something I think we're going to see more and more of at these low price points in the future. That's a good thing, too, because it simply and cheaply allows end users to decide if they want to skew more towards acoustics or performance instead of having to find some nebulous halfway point to satisfy both.

Antec GX700 Specifications
Motherboard Form Factor Mini-ITX, Micro-ATX, ATX
Drive Bays External 3x 5.25"
Internal 5x 2.5"/3.5"
Cooling Front 2x 120mm fan mount
Rear 1x 120mm exhaust fan
Top 2x 140mm exhaust fan (supports 2x120mm)
Side 1x 120mm fan mount
Bottom -
Expansion Slots 7
I/O Port 2x USB 3.0, 2x USB 2.0, 1x Headphone, 1x Mic
Power Supply Size ATX
Clearances HSF 160mm
PSU 200mm
GPU 290mm
Dimensions 19.7" x 7.9" x 17.7"
500mm x 200mm x 450mm
Weight 13.8 lbs. (6.26 kg)
Special Features USB 3.0 via internal header
Two-speed, four channel fan controller
Support for 240mm radiators
Price $59

As you can see, the GX700 has a pretty healthy amount of cooling capacity. Antec continues to lean on negative air pressure cooling designs, but to be fair, that hasn't really set them back. Positive pressure is generally better in terms of keeping dust out of the enclosure, but the Eleven Hundred's stellar performance proves negative pressure can work just as well.

What's mostly impressive is just eyeballing the spec sheet and then seeing the price. The GX700 isn't readily available yet, but if Antec really does hit $59, the other vendors may wind up having to at least take notice.

In and Around the Antec GX700
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  • Bonesdad - Friday, January 18, 2013 - link

    far too ugly to look beyond any goodness inside...try try again Antec. Reply
  • Hrel - Friday, January 18, 2013 - link

    It looks like a Tonka Trunk. Not even a good one, a cheap one. that's literally my only complaint with this case. If they release one that's just black, no other colors anywhere. Then that's a case I can recommend to people. Honstly just change the colors to all black and it's "good enough".

    For my personal use I wouldn't buy it because the lines are wrong AND the colors are ugly. I like the sleek industrial look. I'm also willing to go up to 100 on cases.

    Bottom line, I'm impressed they built a case that performs THAT well and is tooless AND has a fan controller that's actually effective. Those are some damn good acoustic levels. Simplify the lines, get rid of the unnecesary ditches around the 5.25 drives, cover the top one with a temp readout maybe, make it all black, add some dampening foam and charge 100 bucks. I'd buy it.
    Reply
  • alyf - Friday, January 18, 2013 - link

    The "botherboard" tray? :) Reply
  • jabber - Saturday, January 19, 2013 - link

    When can we get a grown up case that reeks of style and sophistication? Reply
  • HardwareDufus - Saturday, January 19, 2013 - link

    hideous at any price Reply
  • mapesdhs - Saturday, January 19, 2013 - link


    Reading this kind of review convinces me all the more of the wisom of my obtaining used
    Antec 300 cases whenever I can. Half the price, better IMO. And when I say used, I just
    mean eBay; some of the ones I've bought have been sold as new/unused, so even better.

    Ian.
    Reply
  • nwarawa - Saturday, January 19, 2013 - link

    I've been waiting for a case to de-throne the HAF 912 for some time now in the $50-$60 range... looks like I will keep on waiting. If CoolerMaster could release a HAF 913 with USB3.0 support... maybe also add a few for 2.5" doo-dads for the growing prevalence of ssds... that would be awesome. But even as is, I have yet to see another case come close. The modular HDD bay is just awesome, cooling options are top notch, and the lack of flimsy steel just seals the deal. Reply
  • dj christian - Monday, January 21, 2013 - link

    "The drive trays slide in from the rear of the botherboard tray instead of above like most cases"

    What do you mean? How can you slide them in from above?
    Reply
  • Hrel - Thursday, January 24, 2013 - link

    if you have the case laid on it's side, like you would if you were installing things. Reply
  • chrome_slinky - Thursday, January 24, 2013 - link

    I really do wish that people [especially reviewers] would quit assuming that they know what it is the public wants -

    To wit - " We don't need four 5.25" bays anymore anyhow (we really only need two at most these days)."

    This is not true for many, and especially the "high performance" crowd to which this is supposedly addressed.

    I love the build quality of the older Antec cases, and what has kept me from buying again, but instead buying Cooler Master, is exactly that there are not more open bays in the case.

    I still use a floppy on occasion, have 250MB internal Zip drives, and do my copying of optical stuff directly from one drive to another - that accounts for four, and does not make much room for a fan controller or a display of some sort.

    I fully realize I am not the norm, but, after taking a quick survey of about 20 friends, I am not in a SMALL minority either. Most people I speak to [and come in contact with daily, as part of my job - selling, repairing, and maintaining computers] think that 6, my favorite, is excessive, also think that 3 is too few.
    Reply

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