Introducing the Fractal Design Define XL R2

Amusingly and appropriately enough, the wave of silence-oriented enclosures that have been popping up recently haven't really drawn attention to themselves as a trend. Yet all of a sudden, we have results from a couple of solid contenders from Nanoxia and a few less expensive (and more readily available) also-rans. For a little while, this was a wave that Fractal Design was riding high, but the Define R4 wound up being a little underwhelming. As it turns out, they might just have something better lying in wait.

We never had a chance to play with the original Fractal Design Define XL, so it's tough to draw a direct comparison there. Yet one look at Fractal Design's page for the original tells you that while the Define R4 didn't change much from the R3, the Define XL R2 is a major shift. The original XL didn't support E-ATX; it was more just a conventional Define with a separate drive compartment. This R2, on the other hand, really is a giant Define R4. As it turns out, that bump in size and modest increase in cooling capacity may very well have been all the Define R4 needed.

There are two dead horses I need to bludgeon before we progress any further with this review. First, the quiet chassis to beat are the Deep Silence 1 and 2 from Nanoxia; availability notwithstanding, those two offer the best value and best balance of performance and acoustics. In the XL R2's price bracket, the Deep Silence 1 is basically the bar. Keep in mind, though, that the DS1 is a smaller case than the XL R2, so if you need the extra space, Fractal Design may just win by default.

The other thing to keep in mind is that designing a quiet chassis is basically one of the hardest things a vendor can do. What you're essentially trying to do is get the system inside the case to a noise level low enough that the sound dampening material can do the rest of the job. High end enthusiast cases tend to be very quiet because of their copious high power, low noise airflow. What we want is a case that can get below that already low noise floor. The problem is that doing so means closing off a lot of ventilation; capturing sound means capturing air, and reduced airflow means reduced thermal performance.

Fractal Design Define XL R2 Specifications
Motherboard Form Factor Mini-ITX, Micro-ATX, ATX, E-ATX, XL-ATX
Drive Bays External 4x 5.25"
Internal 8x 2.5"/3.5"
Cooling Front 1x 140mm intake fan (mount supports 120mm; second 120/140mm fan mount below)
Rear 1x 140mm exhaust fan (mount supports 120mm)
Top 2x 120mm/140mm fan mount
Side 1x 120mm/140mm fan mount
Bottom 1x 140mm intake fan (mount supports 120mm)
Expansion Slots 9
I/O Port 2x USB 3.0, 2x USB 2.0, 1x Headphone, 1x Mic
Power Supply Size ATX
Clearances HSF 170mm
PSU 190mm
GPU 330mm
Dimensions 9.13" x 22.01" x 22.04"
232mm x 559mm x 560mm
Weight 36.16 lbs / 16.4 kg
Special Features Removable fan filter
USB 3.0 via internal header
Three step fan controller supports three fans
Acoustic padding on the interior and side panels
Modular, rotatable drive cages
Price MSRP $129

Consider that the two Deep Silence cases are already pretty heavy and well built in their own right, then add another ten pounds and three inches. The Define XL R2 is made almost entirely of steel with really the bare minimum of plastic used in its construction, and you definitely feel it. This is a big case, but Fractal Design was able to hit a very aggressive price point with it. The last generation Define XL cost a full $40 more.

In and Around the Fractal Design Define XL R2
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  • piroroadkill - Thursday, February 21, 2013 - link

    The top of the case above the mobo has plenty of space left for a rad, that was mentioned.

    But yes, it wasn't tested.
    Reply
  • BlueReason - Thursday, February 21, 2013 - link

    Yeah that'll fit my two ssds nicely. Reply
  • DLeRium - Monday, February 25, 2013 - link

    So you spend 2 precious reviews on these two cases, give them gold and bronze awards, and they don't show up in any other case reviews? How am I supposed to make an informed purchasing decision? Reply
  • Texax - Wednesday, November 13, 2013 - link

    Pardon my ignorance but what does 12v, 7v and 5v mean? Power supply output? Reply
  • Nicholas Steel - Sunday, March 30, 2014 - link

    Could someone explain the difference between (7v) and (12v) on the Noise and Thermal Testing page? The page explaining the system setups doesn't explain why the case is listed twice in the benchmarks with an arbitrary designation... Reply
  • Nicholas Steel - Sunday, March 30, 2014 - link

    Oh wait, nevermind. I forgot you're testing each Case Fan Preset. Reply

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